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Examination of the consistency of interviewer performance across three distinct interview contexts

Powell, Martine B, Cavezza, Cristina, Hughes-Scholes, Carolyn and Stoove, Mark 2010, Examination of the consistency of interviewer performance across three distinct interview contexts, Psychology, crime & law, vol. 16, no. 7, pp. 585-600, doi: 10.1080/10683160902971063.

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Title Examination of the consistency of interviewer performance across three distinct interview contexts
Author(s) Powell, Martine BORCID iD for Powell, Martine B orcid.org/0000-0001-5092-1308
Cavezza, Cristina
Hughes-Scholes, Carolyn
Stoove, Mark
Journal name Psychology, crime & law
Volume number 16
Issue number 7
Start page 585
End page 600
Total pages 16
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2010-09
ISSN 1068-316X
Keyword(s) investigative interviewing
child sexual abuse
interviewer training
forensic psychology
individual stability
Summary The current study examined the consistency of investigative interviewers' performance (n=31) across three distinct interview paradigms: (a) a mock interview where an adult actor played the role of a child recalling abuse, (b) a mock interview where a school child recalled an innocuous event that was staged at the child's school, and (c) a field interview where the interviewer elicited a statement of abuse from a child. Performance was measured by calculating the proportion of open-ended and leading questions, and by eliciting expert ratings of the presence of a range of problem behaviours commonly exhibited by interviewers. Overall, the performance of individual interviewers was relatively stable across the tasks. Heterogeneity in stability, however, differed according to the type of question and the nature of the event being examined. In particular, the mock interview paradigm where the adult acted the role of an alleged child abuse victim produced a measure of performance that was more similar to the field interview than the interview where a school child recalled an innocuous event. The implications of the findings for trainers, and directions for future research, are discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/10683160902971063
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30032018

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Higher Education Research Group
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Created: Thu, 16 Dec 2010, 14:18:52 EST by Jane Moschetti

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