You are not logged in.

An examination of the association between interviewer question type and story-grammar detail in child witness interviews about abuse

Feltis, Brooke B., Powell, Martine B., Snow, Pamela C. and Hughes-Scholes, Carolyn 2010, An examination of the association between interviewer question type and story-grammar detail in child witness interviews about abuse, Child Abuse & Neglect, vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 407-413, doi: 10.1016/j.chiabu.2009.09.019.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title An examination of the association between interviewer question type and story-grammar detail in child witness interviews about abuse
Author(s) Feltis, Brooke B.
Powell, Martine B.ORCID iD for Powell, Martine B. orcid.org/0000-0001-5092-1308
Snow, Pamela C.
Hughes-Scholes, Carolyn
Journal name Child Abuse & Neglect
Volume number 34
Issue number 6
Start page 407
End page 413
Total pages 7
Publisher Pergamon
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2010-06
ISSN 0145-2134
1873-7757
Summary Objective : This study compared the effects of open-ended versus specific questions, and various types of open-ended questions, in eliciting story-grammar detail in child abuse interviews.
Methods : The sample included 34 police interviews with child witnesses aged 5–15 years (M age = 9 years, 9 months). The interviewers’ questions and their relative sub-types were classified according to definitions reported in the child interview training literature. The children's responses were classified according to the proportion of story grammar and the prevalence of individual story grammar elements as defined by Stein and Glenn (1979).
Results : Open-ended questions were more effective at eliciting story grammar than specific questions. This finding was revealed across three age groups, two interview phases and irrespective of how question effectiveness was measured. However, not all types of open-ended questions were equally effective. Open-ended questions that encouraged a broad response, or asked the child to elaborate on a part of their account, elicited more story-grammar detail compared to open-ended questions that requested clarification of concepts or descriptions of the next (or another) activity or detail within a sequence.
Conclusions : This study demonstrates that children's ability to provide story-grammar detail is maximised when there is minimal prompting from the interviewer.
Practical implications : Given the association between story grammar production and victim credibility, greater guidance is warranted in interviewer training programs in relation to the effects and administration of different types of open-ended questions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.chiabu.2009.09.019
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30032019

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Higher Education Research Group
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 19 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 21 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 479 Abstract Views, 5 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 16 Dec 2010, 14:25:15 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.