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The use of table and cooking salt in a sample of Australian adults

Grimes, Carley A., Riddell, Lynn and Nowson, Caryl A. 2010, The use of table and cooking salt in a sample of Australian adults, Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 256-260.

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Title The use of table and cooking salt in a sample of Australian adults
Author(s) Grimes, Carley A.
Riddell, Lynn
Nowson, Caryl A.
Journal name Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition
Volume number 19
Issue number 2
Start page 256
End page 260
Total pages 5
Publisher HEC Press
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2010
ISSN 0964-7058
Keyword(s) Sodium
Dietary
Table salt
Australia
Public health
Summary Dietary sodium, the major source being salt, is associated with hypertension. Australian adults consume more than the recommended amount of salt and approximately 15% of dietary sodium comes from salt added at the table and during cooking. Objective: To determine the frequency of and the demographic characteristics associated with discretionary salt use. Design: A cross sectional survey conducted in shopping centres within Metropolitan Melbourne. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing discretionary salt use and attitudes to salt intake. Outcomes: Four hundred and seventy four surveys were collected (65% female, 77% Caucasian, 64% holding a university qualification). Eighty nine percent of respondents were classified as salt users and 11% as non-salt users. Of the salt users 52% reported that they always or sometimes add salt during cooking and at the table. Those of Asian descent and younger respondents aged 18-24 years were more likely to be salt users (chi2=12.3, df=2, p<0.001; chi2=19.2, df=5, p<0.01). Conclusion: Discretionary salt use remains high. To successfully reduce population dietary salt intake public health campaigns are urgently required and need to include consumer advice to reduce discretionary salt use, whilst reducing the salt added to processed foods. Such campaigns should include younger age groups and should be appropriate for all ethnic backgrounds to raise the awareness of the risks of a high salt diet on health.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, HEC Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30032065

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.