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Perfecting nature : Friedrich Nietzsche's ideal and politics of cultivation

Cugola, Adriano Dino 1990, Perfecting nature : Friedrich Nietzsche's ideal and politics of cultivation, Ph.D. thesis, School of Humanities, Deakin University.

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Title Perfecting nature : Friedrich Nietzsche's ideal and politics of cultivation
Author Cugola, Adriano Dino
Institution Deakin University
School School of Humanities
Faculty Faculty of Arts and Education
Degree name Ph.D.
Thesis advisor Charlesworth, Max
Date submitted 1990
Summary What I have called the Ideal of Cultivation is a fundamental ethical principle of civilisation, originated by aristocratic warriors in Greek antiquity who held that the true purpose of humanity is to perfect nature

It was then professed that individuals and even entire peoples could consciously develop and improve themselves in a way that was thought to obey the original lawful impulses of nature, a process which was likened to those of agriculture and animal husbandry.

Subsequently the cognate idea of a politics of cultivation arose which deemed that society should be organised specifically to produce more virtuous or perfect human types. Given their fundamental association with Hellenism both ideas have been revisited constantly in the intellectual history of the west, and most notably during the great secular periods, the Renaissance and Enlightenment when active attempts were made to retrieve the ideals of antiquity. Both ideas were particularly pervasive in the German enlightenment, the Aufklärung, and were assimilated by the succeeding Romantic generation.

In nineteenth century Germany, when interest in these ideas was quickly waning, the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche acquired an unswerving attachment to them and made the service of them his life's work.

The intention of this essay is to trace methodically the appearance of the Ideal of Cultivation in Nietzsche's philosophy and politics, and to outline his responses to a world which was abandoning the principles in which he deeply believed. This essay should be regarded as a case study in the long history of a fundamental ethical idea rather than one about the philosopher Nietzsche.
Language eng
Field of Research 220209 History of Ideas
160609 Political Theory and Political Philosophy
220207 History and Philosophy of the Humanities
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
Dewey Decimal Classification 171.3 Cug/Pna
Copyright notice ┬ęThe Author. All Rights Reserved
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30032069

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Created: Thu, 23 Dec 2010, 10:22:51 EST by Guest Thesis Author

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.