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Consumer awareness and self-reported behaviours related to salt consumption in Australia

Webster, Jacqueline, Li, Nicole, Dunford, Elizabeth K., Nowson, Caryl A. and Neal, Bruce 2010, Consumer awareness and self-reported behaviours related to salt consumption in Australia, Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 550-554.

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Title Consumer awareness and self-reported behaviours related to salt consumption in Australia
Author(s) Webster, Jacqueline
Li, Nicole
Dunford, Elizabeth K.
Nowson, Caryl A.
Neal, Bruce
Journal name Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition
Volume number 19
Issue number 4
Start page 550
End page 554
Total pages 5
Publisher HEC Press
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2010
ISSN 0964-7058
Keyword(s) Salt
Sodium
Consumer
Behaviour
Public health
Summary Australians are eating far more salt than is good for health. In May 2007, the Australian Division of World Action on Salt and Health (AWASH) launched a campaign to reduce population salt intake. A consumer survey was commissioned to quantify baseline aspects of awareness and behaviour related to salt and health amongst Australians. A total of 1084 individuals aged 14 years or over were surveyed by ACA Research using an established consumer panel. Participants were selected to include people of each sex, within different age bands, from major metropolitan and other areas of all Australian states and territories. Participants were invited via email to complete a brief questionnaire online. Two-thirds knew that salt was bad for health but only 14% knew the recommended maximum daily intake. Seventy percent correctly identified that most dietary salt comes from processed foods but only a quarter regularly checked food labels for salt content. Even fewer reported their food purchases were influenced by the salt level indicated (21%). The survey showed a moderate understanding of how salt effects health but there was little evidence of action to reduce salt intake. Consumer education will be one part of the effort necessary to reduce salt intake in Australia and will require government investment in a targeted campaign to achieve improvements in knowledge and behaviours.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2010
Copyright notice ©2010, HEC Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30032089

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.