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Is healthy behavior contagious : associations of social norms with physical activity and healthy eating

Ball, Kylie, Jeffery, Robert, Abbott, Gavin, McNaughton, Sarah A. and Crawford, David A. 2010, Is healthy behavior contagious : associations of social norms with physical activity and healthy eating, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 7, no. 86, pp. 1-27.

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Title Is healthy behavior contagious : associations of social norms with physical activity and healthy eating
Author(s) Ball, Kylie
Jeffery, Robert
Abbott, Gavin
McNaughton, Sarah A.
Crawford, David A.
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 7
Issue number 86
Start page 1
End page 27
Total pages 27
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2010-12-07
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Social norms
Social support
Physical activity
Eating
Summary Background
Social norms are theoretically hypothesized to influence health-related behaviors such as physical activity and eating behaviors. However, empirical evidence relating social norms to these behaviors, independently of other more commonly-investigated social constructs such as social support, is scarce and findings equivocal, perhaps due to limitations in the ways in which social norms have been conceptualized and assessed. This study investigated associations between clearly-defined social norms and a range of physical activity and eating behaviors amongst women, adjusting for the effects of social support.

Methods
Self-report survey data about particular physical activity (leisure-time moderate-vigorous activity; volitional walking; cycling for transport) and eating behaviors (fast food, soft drink and fruit and vegetable consumption), and social norms and support for these, were provided by 3,610 women aged 18-46 years living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods in Victoria, Australia.

Results
Results of regression analyses showed that social norms for physical activity and eating behaviors predicted these respective behaviors relatively consistently; these associations generally remained significant after adjustment for social support.

Conclusions
Acknowledging the cross-sectional study design, these data confirm theoretical accounts of the importance of social norms for physical activity and eating behaviors, and suggest that this is independent from social support. Intervention strategies aimed at promoting physical activity and healthy eating could incorporate strategies aimed at modifying social norms relating to these behaviors.
Language eng
Field of Research 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30032114

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.