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Experiences of engagement in occupations and assertive outreach services

Hitch, Danielle 2009, Experiences of engagement in occupations and assertive outreach services, British journal of occupational therapy, vol. 72, no. 11, pp. 482-490.

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Title Experiences of engagement in occupations and assertive outreach services
Author(s) Hitch, Danielle
Journal name British journal of occupational therapy
Volume number 72
Issue number 11
Start page 482
End page 490
Total pages 9
Publisher College of Occupational Therapists
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2009-11
ISSN 0308-0226
1477-6006
Keyword(s) Engagement
occupations
community mental health
assertive outreach
Summary Aim: The purpose of this study was to describe the experience and meaning of engagement for staff and clients of assertive outreach teams.
Method: Interpretative phenomenological analysis was selected for its flexibility and transparency. Data were collected by semi-structured interviews from a sample of five client and five staff participants (n = 10). The interviews were analysed idiographically, inductively and interrogatively.
Findings: Four themes identified by both staff and client participants emerged: engagement as an interpersonal relationship, engagement in and through time, enabling and disabling factors and engagement in occupation. In addition, clients developed a theme around engagement as a means to self-actualisation. Staff also raised a specific theme around the role of engagement in mental health services.
Conclusion: Staff and clients experienced engagement in broadly similar ways, but with differing emphases. Although all participants described it as both an invisible 'means' and a visible 'end', the staff related engagement only to mental health services whereas the clients experienced it in the context of both mental health services and occupations.
Relevance: This study is relevant to all occupational therapists who work with people experiencing mental health problems.
Notes
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Language eng
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920209 Mental Health Services
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, College of Occupational Therapists
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30032185

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.