Openly accessible

Comparing the physiological cost of step-powered video gaming, sedentary video gaming and self paced ambulatory activity in university students

Ridgers, Nicola Diane, McKinney, Joanna, Stratton, Gareth and Graves, Lee E.F. 2011, Comparing the physiological cost of step-powered video gaming, sedentary video gaming and self paced ambulatory activity in university students, Archives of exercise in health and disease, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 81-88.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
ridgers-comparingthephysiological-2011.pdf Published version application/pdf 210.54KB 507

Title Comparing the physiological cost of step-powered video gaming, sedentary video gaming and self paced ambulatory activity in university students
Author(s) Ridgers, Nicola Diane
McKinney, Joanna
Stratton, Gareth
Graves, Lee E.F.
Journal name Archives of exercise in health and disease
Volume number 2
Issue number 1
Start page 81
End page 88
Total pages 8 p.
Publisher CIAFEL
Place of publication Plácido Costa, Portugal
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1647-1652
Keyword(s) video gaming
physical activity
general ergonomics
physical work capacity
Actiheart
Summary Objectives: Methods for converting inactive video gaming to active video gaming have gained popularity in recent years. This study compared the physiological cost of a new peripheral device that used steps to power video gaming in an interactive manner against sedentary video gaming and self-paced ambulatory activity of university students (aged 19-29 years).
Methods: Nineteen adults (9 male, 10 female) performed six 10-minute activities, namely self-paced leisurely walking, self-paced brisk walking, self-paced jogging, two forms of sedentary video gaming, and step-powered video gaming. Activities were performed in a random order. Physiological cost during the activities was measured using Actiheart.
Results: Energy expenditure during step-powered video gaming (388.8 kcal.h-1) was comparable to the energy expended during brisk walking (373.8 kcal.h-1), and elicited a higher energy cost than sedentary video gaming (124.1 kcal.h-1) but a lower energy cost than jogging (694.5 kcal.h-1).
Conclusion: Overall, step-powered video gaming could be used as an entertaining and appealing tool to increase physical activity, though it should not be used as a complete substitute for traditional exercise, such as jogging.
Language eng
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, CIAFEL. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share — to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30032208

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 447 Abstract Views, 507 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 11 Jan 2011, 14:20:14 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.