Daring to Care : is spirituality sustainable in organizations providing healthcare?

Gates, Donald K., Rodwell, John, Steane, Peter and Noblet, Andrew 2010, Daring to Care : is spirituality sustainable in organizations providing healthcare?, in ANZAM 2010 : Refereed Papers of the 24th Annual Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference, ANZAM, [Adelaide, S.Aust.], pp. 1-26.

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Title Daring to Care : is spirituality sustainable in organizations providing healthcare?
Author(s) Gates, Donald K.
Rodwell, John
Steane, Peter
Noblet, Andrew
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference (24th : 2010 : Adelaide, S.Aust.)
Conference location Adelaide, S.Aust.
Conference dates 8-10 Dec. 2010
Title of proceedings ANZAM 2010 : Refereed Papers of the 24th Annual Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2010
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference
Start page 1
End page 26
Total pages 26
Publisher ANZAM
Place of publication [Adelaide, S.Aust.]
Keyword(s) altruism
compassion
economic rationalism
faith-based organizations
holistic ministry
mercy
Summary Healthcare workers are challenged to dare to care enough to provide a service that is holistic. This involves being in tune with their own spirituality and the spiritual needs of their patients or clients. Spirituality and compassion are important concepts in the ministry of nurses and other health professionals. Compassion also has links with mercy, although there is debate as to whether mercy is the same as compassion for deserving or undeserving sufferers. However, healthcare workers need to care for sufferers even if their suffering is not deserved, where such compassion is intrinsic and/or out of duty. It involves acting altruistically. Faith-based organizations are best equipped to undertake this holistic ministry but as they are becoming increasingly reliant on government funding to help finance expensive health services they encounter rationalistic pressures from these funding sources may restrict the way they deliver these services. Decision and policymakers are encouraged to embrace altruistic values rather than the egoistic values of economic rationalism, not least because the nature of healthcare has an inherent emphasis on altruistic emotions, especially compassion.
Notes Conference program : http://www.anzamconference.org/docs/ANZAM2010_Program_At_A_Glance.pdf
ISBN 1877040819
Language eng
Field of Research 150305 Human Resources Management
Socio Economic Objective 910402 Management
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30032291

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Faculty of Business and Law
Deakin Graduate School of Business
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