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Call for research – the consuming child-in-context in unhealthy and unsustainable times

Skouteris, Helen, Do, Michael, Rutherford, Leonie, Cutter-Mackenzie, Amy and Edwards, Susan 2010, Call for research – the consuming child-in-context in unhealthy and unsustainable times, Australian journal of environmental education, vol. 26, pp. 33-45.

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Title Call for research – the consuming child-in-context in unhealthy and unsustainable times
Author(s) Skouteris, Helen
Do, Michael
Rutherford, Leonie
Cutter-Mackenzie, Amy
Edwards, Susan
Journal name Australian journal of environmental education
Volume number 26
Start page 33
End page 45
Total pages 13
Publisher Australian Association for Environmental Education
Place of publication Bellingen, N.S.W.
Publication date 2010
ISSN 0814-0626
Summary Childhood obesity is a highly complex issue with serious health and environmental implications. It has been postulated that young children (preschool-aged in particular) are able to internalise positive environmental beliefs. Applying a socioecological theoretical perspective, in this discussion paper we argue that although children may internalise such beliefs, they commonly behave in ways that contradict these beliefs as demonstrated by their consumer choices. The media directly influences these consumer choices and growing evidence suggests that media exposure (particularly commercial television viewing) may be a significant “player” in the prediction of childhood obesity. However, there is still debate as to whether childhood obesity is caused by digital media use per se or whether other factors mediate this relationship. Growing evidence suggests that researchers should examine whether different types of content have conflicting influences on a child’s consumer choices and, by extension, obesity. The extent to which young children connect their consumer choices and the sustainability of the product/s they consume with their overall health and wellbeing has not previously been researched. To these ends, we call for further research on this socioecological phenomenon among young children, particularly with respect to the influence of digital media use on a child’s consumer behaviours.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 200199 Communication and Media Studies not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970120 Expanding Knowledge in Language, Communication and Culture
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Australian Association for Environmental Education
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30032669

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