Low and high birth weight as risk factors for obesity among 4 to 5 year old Australian children : does gender matter?

Oldroyd, John, Renzaho, Andre and Skouteris, Helen 2011, Low and high birth weight as risk factors for obesity among 4 to 5 year old Australian children : does gender matter?, European journal of pediatrics, vol. 170, no. 7, pp. 899-906.

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Title Low and high birth weight as risk factors for obesity among 4 to 5 year old Australian children : does gender matter?
Author(s) Oldroyd, John
Renzaho, Andre
Skouteris, Helen
Journal name European journal of pediatrics
Volume number 170
Issue number 7
Start page 899
End page 906
Total pages 8
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publication date 2011
ISSN 0340-6199
1432-1076
Keyword(s) Birth weight
Child obesity
Gender
Summary Studies testing whether birth weight and childhood obesity differ by gender are lacking. We aimed to describe the relationship between birth weight and childhood overweight/obesity and investigate the influence that gender has on this relationship among 4 to 5-year-old children. We performed a secondary analysis of an Australian nationally representative cross-sectional study in 4 to 5-year-old children. The main outcome measure was child overweight and obesity. We found that low birth weight (LBW) was associated with lower risk of overweight/obesity among girls at 4–5 years before (OR 0.50, 95%CI 0.32, 0.77) and after adjusting for socio-demographic factors (OR 0.51 95%CI 0.33, 0.80) and ethnicity (OR 0.52, 95%CI 0.33, 0.81) but was not associated with child overweight/obesity among boys before or after adjustment. High birth weight (HBW) was associated with a higher risk of overweight/obesity among both girls (adjusted OR: 1.76, 95%CI 1.12, 2.78) and boys (adjusted OR: 2.42 95% CI 2.06, 2.86). Conclusion: There are gender differences in the association of birth weight with child overweight/obesity. HBW was associated with a higher risk of child overweight/obesity in boys and girls before and after adjustment for socio-demographic factors. However, LBW was associated with a lower risk of child overweight/obesity in girls but not in boys. These gender differences need to be considered when planning interventions to reduce child overweight/obesity.
Notes Published online 22 December 2010
Language eng
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
Socio Economic Objective 920206 Health Inequalities
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Springer-Verlag
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30032731

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