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The impact of learning in the workplace policy on differing ICT degrees

Venables, Anne, Tan, Grace and Bellucci, Emilia 2009, The impact of learning in the workplace policy on differing ICT degrees, in WACE 2009 : Proceedings of the WACE 16th World Conference on Cooperative Education and Work Integrated Learning, World Association for Cooperative Education, Boston, Mass., pp. 1-6.

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Title The impact of learning in the workplace policy on differing ICT degrees
Author(s) Venables, Anne
Tan, Grace
Bellucci, Emilia
Conference name Cooperative Education and Work Integrated Learning World Conference (16th : 2009 : Vancouver, Canada)
Conference location Vancouver, Canada
Conference dates 23-26 Jun. 2009
Title of proceedings WACE 2009 : Proceedings of the WACE 16th World Conference on Cooperative Education and Work Integrated Learning
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2009
Conference series Cooperative Education and Work Integrated Learning World Conference
Start page 1
End page 6
Publisher World Association for Cooperative Education
Place of publication Boston, Mass.
Keyword(s) course management
curriculum development
ICT education
workplace learning
Australia
Summary At Victoria University, the release of a new Learning in the Workplace and Community (LiWC) policy has been introduced to ensure that graduates are job and career ready. The policy underlines the importance of workplace contextual learning in all course deliveries and is scheduled for progressive implementation by 2010. For each degree, the policy mandates that a minimum of 25% of program content and assessment must be related to work integrated learning.

Compliance with the 25% shift poses significant challenges for its implementation upon all undergraduate programs since the policy is expected to impact upon program structures, unit deliveries, assessment practices, and course administrations. In particular, there has been an extensive review of existing approaches to learning and teaching in the programs that deliver information and communications technology (ICT) degrees across business and science faculties. This paper describes the current Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Bachelor of Business in Information Systems programs identifying similarities and differences between the two offerings with respect to their learning in workplace components. It explores possible synergies between the two programs that could be capitalized upon to implement the LiWC policy and details the challenges to both faculties in mounting a coordinated response.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner
Language eng
Field of Research 080699 Information Systems not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970108 Expanding Knowledge in the Information and Computing Sciences
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2009, World Association for Cooperative Education
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30032777

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Information and Business Analytics
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.