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Disrobing the emperor : mainstream CSR research and corporate hegemony

Jones, Marc T. 2009, Disrobing the emperor : mainstream CSR research and corporate hegemony, Management of environmental quality, vol. 20, no. 3, Special issue : corporate responsibility and diversity, pp. 335-346, doi: 10.1108/14777830910950720.

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Title Disrobing the emperor : mainstream CSR research and corporate hegemony
Author(s) Jones, Marc T.
Journal name Management of environmental quality
Volume number 20
Issue number 3
Season Special issue : corporate responsibility and diversity
Start page 335
End page 346
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1477-7835
Keyword(s) corporate social responsibility
globalization
transnational companies
hegemony
Summary Purpose – This paper aims to utilise a typological matrix as the basis to categorise various corporate-society interventions. It aims to argue that an instrumental version of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is hegemonic in both the theoretical and normative domains of mainstream research, and that this hegemony underpins an intellectual blockage that prevents the field from achieving critical reflexivity and ultimately, a justifiable raison d'e^tre.

Design/methodology/approach – The paper reflects on the extant CSR literature in the context of globalisation; presents a two-dimensional typological matrix to be used in positioning corporate-society interventions; provides examples of particular activities relevant to each quadrant of the matrix; and considers the wider political economy of CSR research.

Findings –
The logical implications of the corporation as an institution behaving in increasing accordance with the normative expectations of mainstream CSR scholarship will likely lead in the direction of increasing corporate hegemony.

Practical implications – The paper proposes the adoption of the more theoretically coherent and empirically precise terms enlightened self-interest and corporate social irresponsibility in CSR and related research streams, as well as the institutional relocation of much future CSR research to disciplinary areas outside of the business school.

Originality/value –
The typological matrix presented in this paper offers a new way of locating corporate-society interventions. The partial abandonment of the term “CSR” by researchers, as well as the institutional relocations of much CSR research, are original notions.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/14777830910950720
Field of Research 150399 Business and Management not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 910499 Management and Productivity not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30032809

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.