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Mental context reinstatement increases resistance to false suggestions after children have experienced a repeated event

Drohan-Jennings, Donna M., Roberts, Kim P. and Powell, Martine B. 2010, Mental context reinstatement increases resistance to false suggestions after children have experienced a repeated event, Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 594-606, doi: 10.1080/13218711003739110.

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Title Mental context reinstatement increases resistance to false suggestions after children have experienced a repeated event
Author(s) Drohan-Jennings, Donna M.
Roberts, Kim P.
Powell, Martine B.ORCID iD for Powell, Martine B. orcid.org/0000-0001-5092-1308
Journal name Psychiatry, Psychology and Law
Volume number 17
Issue number 4
Start page 594
End page 606
Total pages 13
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Oxon, England
Publication date 2010-11
ISSN 1321-8719
1934-1687
Keyword(s) children’s memory
eyewitness
interviews
memory
mental context
repeated experiences
source monitoring
suggestibility
Summary When children allege repeated abuse, they are required to provide details about specific instances. This often results in children confusing details from different instances, therefore the aim of this study was to examine whether mental context reinstatement (MCR) could be used to improve children’s accuracy. Children (N ¼ 120, 6–7-yearolds) participated in four activities over a 2-week period and were interviewed about the last (fourth) time with a standard recall or MCR interview. They were then asked questions about specific details, and some questions contained false information. When interviewed again 1 day later, children in the MCR condition resisted false suggestions that were consistent with the event more than false suggestions that were inconsistent; in contrast, children in the standard interview condition were equally suggestible for both false detail types and showed a yes bias. The results suggest a practical way of eliciting more accurate information from child witnesses.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/13218711003739110
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30033075

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Higher Education Research Group
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Created: Wed, 02 Mar 2011, 10:56:04 EST by Jane Moschetti

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