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Central venous dialysis : an Australian survey

Bennett, P. N., Janko, A. and Whittington, T. 2005, Central venous dialysis : an Australian survey, Renal Society of Australasia journal, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 49-54.

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Title Central venous dialysis : an Australian survey
Author(s) Bennett, P. N.
Janko, A.
Whittington, T.
Journal name Renal Society of Australasia journal
Volume number 1
Issue number 2
Start page 49
End page 54
Publisher Renal Society of Australasia
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2005-11
ISSN 1832-3804
Keyword(s) haemodialysis
central venous dialysis catheter
nursing
infection
Summary Aim: To explore the current central venous dialysis catheter (CVDC) nursing care practices in Australia. Method: A survey of dialysis units in Australia. Results: 66% return rate (48/73) Internal jugular is the main insertion site (75%) and the majority are tunneled (85%). Insertion was performed most commonly by radiologists (34%) followed by intensivists (24%) with one center reporting insertion by nursing staff. CVDCs were most commonly inserted in radiology (54%), followed by theatre (33%). Dressings were attended weekly (55%) or on dialysis days (45%). Chlorhexidine was the antiseptic solution of choice (54%) followed by povidine-iodine (37%). In 21% of centres Mupirocin was routinely applied in addition to the antiseptic solution. Transparent dressings were overwhelmingly favoured however most centres recommended alternatives related to patient need. 21% of units reported enrolled nurses undertaking dressings. All units reported the use of sterile gloves and sterile dressing packs. 10% reported different routine care for tunneled and non-tunneled. 40% of the units collected data on infection rates per catheter days. General opinion (39%) was identified as the reason to base CVDC protocols while descriptive studies (25%), RCTs (23%) and guidelines (18%) were also reported. Conclusion: There are significant variations in the Australian nursing practice related to the care of CVDCs. Although there is still practice based on general opinion there is evidence that changes in practice in the past 8 years may be associated with knowledge derived from research.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 110312 Nephrology and Urology
Socio Economic Objective 920199 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Renal Society of Australasia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30033140

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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