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The Australian and New Zealand dialysis workforce

Bennett, Paul N., McNeill, Liz and Polaschek, Nick 2009, The Australian and New Zealand dialysis workforce, Renal Society of Australasia, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 147-151.

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Title The Australian and New Zealand dialysis workforce
Author(s) Bennett, Paul N.
McNeill, Liz
Polaschek, Nick
Journal name Renal Society of Australasia
Volume number 5
Issue number 3
Start page 147
End page 151
Publisher Renal Society of Australasia
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2009-11
ISSN 1832-3804
Keyword(s) dialysis
nursing
workforce
education
renal
Summary Aim: To capture a "snapshot" of the current Australian and New Zealand dialysis workforce in order to contribute to the future renal workforce challenges.

Methods:
A web-based survey of dialysis managers (n=221) were asked fifteen questions relating to demographics, age, full-time equivalent information, workforce designation, post-registration qualifications, subjective perceptions of staffing levels, staffing strategies and future dialysis research recommendations

Results:
In Australia in 2008 there were 2433 registered nurses, 188 enrolled nurses and 295 dialysis professionals (technicians) and 327 registered nurses (RNs), 8 enrolled nurses (ENs) and 64 dialysis professionals in New Zealand. There were significant variations in staff/patient ratios, workforce profiles and post-registration qualifications. There is a significant association between staff/ patient and home dialysis ratios. A high proportion of renal staff worked part-time, particularly in Australia. The dialysis workforce reflects the aging nature of the general nursing population in Australia and New Zealand. The majority of dialysis nurse managers perceived they had sufficient staff.

Conclusion:
Workforce variations found in this study may be useful to identify future workforce challenges and strategies.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 110312 Nephrology and Urology
Socio Economic Objective 920199 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Renal Society of Australasia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30033141

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.