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Better definitions, better buildings?

Fuller, R. J. and Taylor, P. 2010, Better definitions, better buildings?, in AUBEA 2010 : Construction Management(s) : Proceedings of the 35th Australasian Universities Building Education Association annual conference, AUBEA, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 1-11.

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Title Better definitions, better buildings?
Author(s) Fuller, R. J.
Taylor, P.
Conference name Australasian Universities Building Education Association. Conference (35th : 2010 : Melbourne, Vic)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 14-16 Jul. 2010
Title of proceedings AUBEA 2010 : Construction Management(s) : Proceedings of the 35th Australasian Universities Building Education Association annual conference
Editor(s) [unknown]
Publication date 2010
Conference series Australasian Universities Building Education Association Conference
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher AUBEA
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) buildings
sustainable
education
curriculum
industry
Summary Because of the magnitude of their impact on the environment, the way we design, build and operate our buildings must change. So-called ‘sustainable’ buildings are now appearing in our cities. However, the term ‘sustainable’ is now so widely used that it has lost all meaning. Other equally ill-defined descriptions are also being used of the new generation of buildings appearing in the built environment. These terms, including ‘environmentally friendly’, ‘low energy’ and ‘green’. This paper argues that a lack of clarity over meaning can foster illusions, reflect careless thinking and/or provide cover for a business-as-usual agenda. In universities, courses for today’s architecture and construction management students are being redesigned to include ‘sustainability’. However, a review of subject guides from Schools of Architecture in Australian universities indicates that ‘sustainability’ is also being used misleadingly. While there is merit in both of the professional accreditation systems for buildings in Australia, there is certainly room for improvement. One scheme reinforces illusions by rewarding features that should merely be regarded as good building design. The ‘sustainability’ objectives of the other scheme have narrowed significantly from the original intent. The authors conclude that the critical thinking of our students will be sharpened by defining sustainability correctly and that meaningless descriptors of buildings must be challenged.
Notes
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Language eng
Field of Research 129999 Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 930302 Syllabus and Curriculum Development
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2010
Copyright notice ©2010, AUBEA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30033243

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.