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The place of place : case studies of place in Victorian planning schemes

Milton, Louise and de Jong, Ursula M. 2010, The place of place : case studies of place in Victorian planning schemes, in UHPH 2010 : Proceedings of the 10th Australasian Urban History, Planning History Conference : Green Fields, Brown Fields, New Fields, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 377-390.

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Title The place of place : case studies of place in Victorian planning schemes
Author(s) Milton, Louise
de Jong, Ursula M.
Conference name Australasian Urban History/Planning History Conference (10th : 2010 : University of Melbourne, Victoria)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 7–10 Feb. 2010
Title of proceedings UHPH 2010 : Proceedings of the 10th Australasian Urban History, Planning History Conference : Green Fields, Brown Fields, New Fields
Editor(s) Nichols, David
Hurlimann, Anna
Mouat, Clare
Pascoe, Stephen
Publication date 2010
Conference series Australasian Urban History and Planning History Conference
Start page 377
End page 390
Total pages 14
Publisher The University of Melbourne
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) planning framework
place identity
place attachement
integrating place into planning
Summary Built environment and lived experience are inextricably interwoven. The Australian State of Victoria’s planning framework prioritises the physical characteristics of space above their socio-psychological correlates, as reflected in the relatively limited remit of ‘place’ in formal decision-making. The Victorian planning model struggles to accommodate the uniqueness of specific places in the process of development, despite the driving role it plays in expansion. A literature review investigating definitions of place and place identity determined that although place has been defined variously, and at times with some contradiction, there is broad consensus that it can be understood as the interrelation between the physical characteristics of a landscape and the sensory faculties of an individual and an individual’s experience. This interrelationship is in turn determined by social constructs. Depending on an individual’s length of residence in a particular physical location, place influences individual and social psychology through both the formation of place attachment and identity. While place attachment to landscapes has been described using a variety of complex methodologies, translation of this work into architectural and planning practice has been limited within Australia in general and Victoria in particular. The Victorian Shires of Surf Coast and Frankston are considered as examples of current best practice in integrating place into planning. Key issues highlighted in the conclusion include: the difficulties of incorporating qualitative information within the Victorian Planning Scheme; the importance of correctly measuring place attachment, rather than landscape preference; and the complexities, costs and ethical implications of describing place attachment for integration within the planning system.
ISBN 073404156X
9780734041562
Language eng
Field of Research 120507 Urban Analysis and Development
Socio Economic Objective 950307 Conserving the Historic Environment
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2010
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30033248

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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