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Regular exercise participation mediates the affective response to acute bouts of vigorous exercise

Hallgren, Mats A., Moss, Nathan D. and Gastin, Paul 2010, Regular exercise participation mediates the affective response to acute bouts of vigorous exercise, Journal of sports science and medicine, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 629-637.

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Title Regular exercise participation mediates the affective response to acute bouts of vigorous exercise
Author(s) Hallgren, Mats A.
Moss, Nathan D.
Gastin, Paul
Journal name Journal of sports science and medicine
Volume number 9
Issue number 4
Start page 629
End page 637
Total pages 9
Publisher Uludag University
Place of publication Bursa, Turkey
Publication date 2010-12-01
ISSN 1303-2968
Keyword(s) exercise
mood
affect
anxiety
exercise adherence
Summary Physical inactivity is a leading factor associated with cardiovascular disease and a major contributor to the global burden of disease in developed countries. Subjective mood states associated with acute exercise are likely to influence future exercise adherence and warrant further investigation. The present study examined the effects of a single bout of vigorous exercise on mood and anxiety between individuals with substantially different exercise participation histories. Mood and anxiety were assessed one day before an exercise test (baseline), 5 minutes before (pre-test) and again 10 and 25 minutes post-exercise. Participants were 31 university students (16 males, 15 females; Age M = 20), with 16 participants reporting a history of regular exercise with the remaining 15 reporting to not exercise regularly. Each participant completed an incremental exercise test on a Monark cycle ergometer to volitional exhaustion. Regular exercisers reported significant post-exercise improvements in mood and reductions in state anxiety. By contrast, non-regular exercisers reported an initial decline in post-exercise mood and increased anxiety, followed by an improvement in mood and reduction in anxiety back to pre-exercise levels. Our findings suggest that previous exercise participation mediates affective responses to acute bouts of vigorous exercise. We suggest that to maximise positive mood changes following exercise, practitioners should carefully consider the individual's exercise participation history before prescribing new regimes.
Notes Reprinted from Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, Vol 9, Hallgren, Mats A., Moss, Nathan D. and Gastin, Paul, Regular exercise participation mediates the affective response to acute bouts of vigorous exercise, 629-637, Copyright (2010), with permission from the JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCE AND MEDICINE.
Language eng
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2010, Journal of sports science and medicine
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30033311

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.