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Psychological responses to acute resistance exercise in men and women who are obese

Levinger, Itamar, Goodman, Craig, Hare, David L., Jerums, George, Morris, Tony and Selig, Steve 2009, Psychological responses to acute resistance exercise in men and women who are obese, Journal of strength and conditioning research, vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 1548-1552.

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Title Psychological responses to acute resistance exercise in men and women who are obese
Author(s) Levinger, Itamar
Goodman, Craig
Hare, David L.
Jerums, George
Morris, Tony
Selig, SteveORCID iD for Selig, Steve orcid.org/0000-0003-4159-5111
Journal name Journal of strength and conditioning research
Volume number 23
Issue number 5
Start page 1548
End page 1552
Total pages 5
Publisher Human Kinetics Publishers, Inc.
Place of publication Lincoln, Neb.
Publication date 2009-08
ISSN 1064-8011
1533-4287
Keyword(s) resistance exercise
psychological distress
obesity
well-being
Summary The purpose of the study was to investigate the psychological response to the very first session of resistance exercise on positive well-being (PWB), psychological distress (PD), and perception of fatigue in untrained men and women who are obese. Forty-five (male = 22, female = 23) untrained, middle-aged volunteers (mean ± SEM, 51.0 ± 1.0; range, 40-69 years) participated in the study. Participants were divided into 4 groups according to sex and obesity level (i.e., men who are obese, men who are nonobese, women who are obese, women who are nonobese). The threshold for obesity was defined as waist circumference ≥94 cm for men and 80 cm for women. Measures included body composition, aerobic power, muscle strength, and quality of life (Short Form 36, SF-36). Before and after resistance exercise, participants completed the Subjective Exercise Experience Scale (SEES). Paired sample t-tests were used to assess changes in SEES scores within group pre- and post-exercise and repeated-measures analysis of variance were used to assess changes in SEES scores between groups. Exercise increased the perception of PWB in both women who are obese and nonobese, without changes in PD or fatigue. In women, the change in PWB after exercise was negatively correlated with most scales of the SF-36, particularly with the mental health dimension (r = -0.55, p < 0.01). No significant changes in PWB, PD, or fatigue were found in men who are obese. Acute resistance exercise improved PWB in women who are obese and nonobese and those with lower self-perceived quality of life scores at the start improved the most. In addition, resistance exercise did not increase feelings of distress in either women or men who are obese.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, National Strength and Conditioning Association
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30033421

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.