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Akt, AS160, metabolic risk factors and aerobic fitness in middle-aged women

Levinger, Itamar, Howlett, Kirsten F., Peake, Jonathan, Garnham, Andrew, Hare, David L., Jerums, George, Selig, Steve and Goodman, Craig 2010, Akt, AS160, metabolic risk factors and aerobic fitness in middle-aged women, Exercise immunology review, vol. 16, pp. 98-104.

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Title Akt, AS160, metabolic risk factors and aerobic fitness in middle-aged women
Author(s) Levinger, Itamar
Howlett, Kirsten F.
Peake, Jonathan
Garnham, Andrew
Hare, David L.
Jerums, George
Selig, Steve
Goodman, Craig
Journal name Exercise immunology review
Volume number 16
Start page 98
End page 104
Total pages 7
Publisher Human Kinetics
Place of publication Champaign, Ill.
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1077-5552
Keyword(s) aerobic fitness
cytokines
inflammation
insulin signaling
Summary This study investigated the association between the basal (rest) insulin-signaling proteins, Akt, and the Akt substrate AS160, metabolic risk factors, inflammatory markers and aerobic fitness, in middle-aged women with varying numbers of metabolic risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Methods: Sixteen women (n=16) aged 51.3±5.1 (mean ±SD) years provided muscle biopsies and blood samples at rest. In addition, anthropometric characteristics and aerobic power were assessed and the number of metabolic risk factors for each participant was determined (IDF criteria). Results: The mean number of metabolic risk factors was 1.6±1.2. Total Akt was negatively correlated with IL-1β (r = -0.45, p = 0.046), IL-6 (r = -0.44, p = 0.052) and TNF-α (r = -0.51, p = 0.025). Phosphorylated AS160 was positively correlated with HDL (r = 0.58, p= 0.024) and aerobic fitness (r = 0.51, p=0.047). Furthermore, a multiple regression analysis revealed that both HDL (t=2.5, p=0.032) and VO<sub>2peak</sub> (t=2.4, p=0.037) were better predictor for phosphorylated AS160 than TNF-α or IL-6 (p>0.05). Conclusions: Elevated inflammatory markers and increased metabolic risk factors may inhibit insulin-signaling protein phosphorylation in middle-aged women, thereby increasing insulin resistance under basal conditions. Furthermore, higher HDL and fitness levels are associated with an increase AS160 phosphorylation, which may in turn reduce insulin resistance.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Human Kinetics
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30033425

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