The effect of acute exercise on undercarboxylated osteocalcin in obese men

Levinger, I., Zebaze, R., Jerums, G., Hare, D. L., Selig, S. and Seeman, E. 2011, The effect of acute exercise on undercarboxylated osteocalcin in obese men, Osteoporosis international, vol. 22, no. 5, pp. 1621-1626.

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Title The effect of acute exercise on undercarboxylated osteocalcin in obese men
Author(s) Levinger, I.
Zebaze, R.
Jerums, G.
Hare, D. L.
Selig, S.
Seeman, E.
Journal name Osteoporosis international
Volume number 22
Issue number 5
Start page 1621
End page 1626
Publisher Springer International
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2011-05
ISSN 0937-941X
1433-2965
Keyword(s) bone metabolism
exercise
glycaemic control
obesity
undercarboxylated osteocalcin
Summary Summary : The purpose of this study was to examine if the reduction in glucose post-exercise is mediated by undercarboxylated osteocalcin (unOC). Obese men were randomly assigned to do aerobic or power exercises. The change in unOC levels was correlated with the change in glucose levels post-exercise. The reduction in glucose post-acute exercise may be partly related to increased unOC.

Introduction : Osteocalcin (OC) in its undercarboxylated (unOC) form may contribute to the regulation of glucose homeostasis. As exercise reduces serum glucose and improves insulin sensitivity in obese individuals and individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), we hypothesised that this benefit was partly mediated by unOC.

Methods : Twenty-eight middle-aged (52.4 ± 1.2 years, mean ± SEM), obese (BMI = 32.1 ± 0.9 kg m−2) men were randomly assigned to do either 45 min of aerobic (cycling at 75% of VO2peak) or power (leg press at 75% of one repetition maximum plus jumping sequence) exercises. Blood samples were taken at baseline and up to 2 h post-exercise.

Results : At baseline, unOC was negatively correlated with glucose levels (r = −0.53, p = 0.003) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) (r = −0.37, p = 0.035). Both aerobic and power exercises reduced serum glucose (from 7.4 ± 1.2 to 5.1 ± 0.5 mmol L−1, p = 0.01 and 8.5 ± 1.2 to 6.0 ± 0.6 mmol L−1, p = 0.01, respectively). Aerobic exercise significantly increased OC, unOC and high-molecular-weight adiponectin, while power exercise had a limited effect on OC and unOC. Overall, those with higher baseline glucose and HbA1c had greater reductions in glucose levels after exercise (r = −0.46, p = 0.013 and r = −0.43, p = 0.019, respectively). In a sub-group of obese people with T2DM, the percentage change in unOC levels was correlated with the percentage change in glucose levels post-exercise (r = −0.51, p = 0.038).

Conclusions : This study reports that the reduction in serum glucose post-acute exercise (especially aerobic exercise) may be partly related to increased unOC.r exercises. The change in unOC levels was correlated with the change in glucose levels post-exercise. The reduction in glucose post-acute exercise may be partly related to increased unOC.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30033426

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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