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From despotism to democracy : reporting Iraq's January 2005 election in the Australian and Middle Eastern print media

Isakhan, Ben 2005, From despotism to democracy : reporting Iraq's January 2005 election in the Australian and Middle Eastern print media, in JEA 2005 : Proceedings of the 2005 Journalism Education Association conference, Griffith University, School of Arts, Griffith, Qld., pp. 1-22.

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Title From despotism to democracy : reporting Iraq's January 2005 election in the Australian and Middle Eastern print media
Author(s) Isakhan, Ben
Conference name Journalism Education Association. Conference (2005, Gold Coast, Queensland)
Conference location Gold Coast, Queensland
Conference dates 29 Nov.-2 Dec. 2005
Title of proceedings JEA 2005 : Proceedings of the 2005 Journalism Education Association conference
Editor(s) Stockwell, Stephen
Isakhan, Ben
Publication date 2005
Conference series Journalism Education Association Conference
Start page 1
End page 22
Publisher Griffith University, School of Arts
Place of publication Griffith, Qld.
Summary It is only in recent times that the magnitude of Ancient Mesopotamia’s contribution to language, agriculture, modern thought and urbane society has begun to be understood. Most relevant to this study is the governance of Mesopotamia’s early city-states by a political system that Jacobsen has termed ‘Primitive Democracy’ where “…ultimate political power rested with a general assembly of all adult freemen” (Jacobsen, 1977; 128). Yet, despite this, the coverage of Iraq in the Western media since its creation at the end of the First World War and particularly since the first Gulf War, has tended towards Orientalism (Said, 1978) by trivialising this nation and thereby reinforcing the hegemony of the West over the ‘backward, barbaric’ East.

This paper examines this issue further by comparing and contrasting the representations of the Iraqi election of January 30, 2005 in four of Australia’s leading daily newspapers (The Australian, The Courier-Mail, The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald) with four Middle Eastern English language papers (The Daily Star from Lebanon, Andolu Agency and Dunya both based in Turkey, and the eponymous Kuwait Times). In essence, it finds that while the Australian media posits democracy as a Western concept and asserts a discourse of US hegemony, the Middle Eastern papers are more contemplative, focusing on the impact that this election could have throughout the region.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9781920952556
1920952551
Language eng
Field of Research 160899 Sociology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2005, Griffith University
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30033457

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Centre for Comparative Social Research
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.