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The role of the press in Iraq's long struggle for democratic reform

Isakhan, Benjamin 2007, The role of the press in Iraq's long struggle for democratic reform, in OURMedia - NUESTROSMedios VI 2007 : Sustainable futures, roles and challenges for community, alternative and citizens's media in the 21st century : Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, The Conference, [Sydney, N.S.W.], pp. 1-33.

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Title The role of the press in Iraq's long struggle for democratic reform
Author(s) Isakhan, Benjamin
Conference name OURMedia - NUESTROSMedios. Conference (VI : 2007 : Sydney, N.S.W.)
Conference location Sydney, N.S.W.
Conference dates 9-13 Apr. 2007
Title of proceedings OURMedia - NUESTROSMedios VI 2007 : Sustainable futures, roles and challenges for community, alternative and citizens's media in the 21st century : Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2007
Conference series Our Media Conference
Start page 1
End page 33
Publisher The Conference
Place of publication [Sydney, N.S.W.]
Summary The toppling of Saddam in 2003 has seen Iraq shift from only a handful of state organs that served as propaganda machines, to a wealth of over 200 Iraqi-owned newspapers which are being fervently produced and avidly read on the streets of the nation. This paper traces the introduction of the printing press to Iraq by the Ottomans and details both the periods where Iraq’s press was truly free and fostered the emergence of a civil society and democratic reforms and those where the Iraqi media was most restricted and did little else than praise the regime at hand. Following on, this paper reviews the developments since the fall of Saddam Hussein and, despite the extensive interference in Iraq’s media sector from the occupying forces, it concludes by arguing that these papers have been central to the re-emergence of an Iraqi public sphere which has openly debated and discussed the issues surrounding the nation’s shift from despotism to democracy.
Notes
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Language eng
Field of Research 160899 Sociology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2007, OURMedia - NUESTROSMedios
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30033465

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Centre for Comparative Social Research
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.