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The early Australian press and the Middle Eastern 'other'

Isakhan, Benjamin 2009, The early Australian press and the Middle Eastern 'other', in ANZCA 2009 : Proceedings of the 2009 Australian and New Zealand Communication Association Conference : Communication, creativity and global citizenship, ANZCA, [Brisbane, Qld.], pp. 730-746.

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Title The early Australian press and the Middle Eastern 'other'
Author(s) Isakhan, Benjamin
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Communication Association. Conference (2009 : Brisbane, Queensland)
Conference location Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland
Conference dates 8-10 Jul. 2009
Title of proceedings ANZCA 2009 : Proceedings of the 2009 Australian and New Zealand Communication Association Conference : Communication, creativity and global citizenship
Editor(s) Flew, Terry
Publication date 2009
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Communication Association Conference
Start page 730
End page 746
Total pages 17
Publisher ANZCA
Place of publication [Brisbane, Qld.]
Keyword(s) orientalism
Australia
media
Islam
history
newspapers
Middle East
Summary In recent years, and particularly since the events of September 11 2001 and the subsequent “War on Terror”, much scholarly attention has been paid to the Australian news media’s role in stereotyping, homogenising, victimising and demonising people of Middle Eastern descent or of the Islamic faith. However, contemporary Australian journalists have not so much invented the tropes and stereotypes that they have used to construct this negative image and limited discursive field, as they have invoked a rich tapestry of pre-existing notions about the non-Western world. This paper therefore seeks to investigate the relationship between Edward Said’s notion of Orientalism and the Australian press of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Beginning with its deplorable coverage of Australia’s Indigenous people and the paranoia surrounding the “Asian Invasion” this paper sheds new light on the coverage of Islam and the Middle East in the early Australian press and the emergence of the “Muslim Menace”. Finally, this chapter concludes by noting that such a racialist history raises a host of questions and challenges for the contemporary Australian news media.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9781741072754
Language eng
Field of Research 160899 Sociology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2009, ANZCA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30033472

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Centre for Comparative Social Research
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