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Increased energy intake entirely accounts for increase in body weight in women but not in men in the UK between 1986 and 2000

Scarborough, Peter, Burg, Melanie R., Foster, Charlie, Swinburn, Boyd, Sacks, Gary, Rayner, Mike, Webster, Premila and Allender, Steven 2011, Increased energy intake entirely accounts for increase in body weight in women but not in men in the UK between 1986 and 2000, British journal of nutrition, vol. 105, no. 09, pp. 1399-1404, doi: 10.1017/S0007114510005076.

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Title Increased energy intake entirely accounts for increase in body weight in women but not in men in the UK between 1986 and 2000
Author(s) Scarborough, Peter
Burg, Melanie R.
Foster, Charlie
Swinburn, Boyd
Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Rayner, Mike
Webster, Premila
Allender, StevenORCID iD for Allender, Steven orcid.org/0000-0002-4842-3294
Journal name British journal of nutrition
Volume number 105
Issue number 09
Start page 1399
End page 1404
Total pages 6
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2011
ISSN 0007-1145
1475-2662
Keyword(s) body weight
obesity
diet
physical activity
energy intake
Summary There is debate over the casual factors for the rise in body weight in the UK. The present study investigates whether increases between 1986 and 2000 for men and women were a result of increases in mean total energy intake, decreases in mean physical activity levels or both. Estimates of mean total energy intake in 1986 and 2000 were derived from food availability data adjusted for wastage. Estimates of mean body weight for adults aged 19–64 years were derived from nationally representative dietary surveys conducted in 1986–7 and 2000–1. Predicted body weight in 1986 and 2000 was calculated using an equation relating body weight to total energy intake and sex. Differences in predicted mean body weight and actual mean body weight between the two time points were compared. Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to assess the stability of the estimates. The predicted increase in mean body weight due to changes in total energy intake between 1986 and 2000 was 4·7 (95 % credible interval 4·2, 5·3) kg for men and 6·4 (95 % credible interval 5·9, 7·1) kg for women. Actual mean body weight increased by 7·7 kg for men and 5·4 kg for women between the two time points. We conclude that increases in mean total energy intake are sufficient to explain the increase in mean body weight for women between 1986 and 2000, but for men, the increase in mean body weight is likely to be due to a combination of increased total energy intake and reduced physical activity levels.
Notes Reproduced with kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0007114510005076
Field of Research 111101 Clinical and Sports Nutrition
111708 Health and Community Services
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30033678

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.