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Existentialism : providing an ideal framework for educational research in times of uncertainty ®

Webster, Scott 2002, Existentialism : providing an ideal framework for educational research in times of uncertainty ®, in AARE 2002 : Problematic futures : educational research in an era of uncertainty ; AARE 2002 conference papers, Australian Association for Research in Education, Coldstream, Vic., pp. 1-15.

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Title Existentialism : providing an ideal framework for educational research in times of uncertainty ®
Author(s) Webster, ScottORCID iD for Webster, Scott orcid.org/0000-0002-5253-4894
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference (2002 : Brisbane, Queensland)
Conference location Brisbane, Queensland
Conference dates 1 - 5 Dec. 2002
Title of proceedings AARE 2002 : Problematic futures : educational research in an era of uncertainty ; AARE 2002 conference papers
Editor(s) Jeffrey, Peter L.
Publication date 2002
Start page 1
End page 15
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Coldstream, Vic.
Summary Issues such as anxiety, alienation, crises and concerns over self-identity typify this era of uncertainty. These are also recognised themes of Existentialism and have implications for educational practice and research. The purpose of this paper is threefold. Firstly, it aims to clarify Existentialism, as too often it is mistakenly assumed to refer to an atomistic view of the individual, who is able to exercise absolute freedom. This clarification refers primarily to the works of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and Heidegger.

The second purpose is to present an outline of a particular existential framework. This is mainly structured around the notion of the learner, who is characterised as being in relation, culturally embedded, alienated and a meaning-maker. These attributes have direct implications for the ideal of 'the educated person' - an often-articulated 'aim' of education programmes. Becoming educated, according to this framework, means becoming authentic, spiritual, critical, empathetic, and having personal identity.

A third purpose is to argue how educators may usefully employ such a framework. By engaging with it, educators are able to examine effective pedagogical approaches using notions of 'the existential crisis' and anxiety. In this way, educational curriculums, programmes and policies can also be critiqued using this framework.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISSN 1324-9320
Language eng
Field of Research 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2002, AARE
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30033908

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.