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Professional paradoxes : context for development of beginning teacher identity and knowledges

White, Julie and Moss, Julianne 2003, Professional paradoxes : context for development of beginning teacher identity and knowledges, in AARE 2003 : Educational research, risks, & dilemmas : Proceedings of the 2003 Australian Association for Research in Education conference, Australian Association for Research in Education, Coldstream, Vic, pp. 1-14.

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Title Professional paradoxes : context for development of beginning teacher identity and knowledges
Author(s) White, Julie
Moss, Julianne
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference (2003 : Auckland, N.Z.)
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 30 Nov. - 3 Dec. 2003
Title of proceedings AARE 2003 : Educational research, risks, & dilemmas : Proceedings of the 2003 Australian Association for Research in Education conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2003
Start page 1
End page 14
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Coldstream, Vic
Summary It is anticipated that the current workforce of teachers in Victoria, Australia will retire within the next 5-15 years. The paradox for teachers at the career entry point is that while they are expected to quickly assume responsibility for education in this state, beginning teachers are reporting dissatisfaction with teaching and describing it as an ‘unprofessional’ profession. Drawing from recently commissioned research for the Victorian Institute of Teaching, a study of sixty beginning teachers and a micro study of the ‘internship’ experience of teacher educators, this paper explores the consequences of what counts as professional knowledge. By problematising identity issues for beginning teachers it is hoped that greater understanding of the complexities of their realities is revealed. The aspirations for the (re) generation of a profession are entangled in discordant displacement of meanings of what it is to become a teacher. What do ‘othering’ and power(less) positions of beginning teachers mean for the immediate future of the profession? What then are the implications for school contexts, colleague support and pre-service teacher education?
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISSN 1176-4902
1324-9320
Language eng
Field of Research 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2003, AARE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30034085

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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