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Problems of psychological and sociocultural adaptation among Russian speaking immigrants in New Zealand

Maydell-Stevens, Elena, Masggoret, Anne-Marie and Ward, Tony 2007, Problems of psychological and sociocultural adaptation among Russian speaking immigrants in New Zealand, Social policy journal of New Zealand : te puna whakaaro, vol. 30, pp. 178-198.

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Title Problems of psychological and sociocultural adaptation among Russian speaking immigrants in New Zealand
Author(s) Maydell-Stevens, Elena
Masggoret, Anne-Marie
Ward, Tony
Journal name Social policy journal of New Zealand : te puna whakaaro
Volume number 30
Start page 178
End page 198
Publisher Social Policy Agency
Place of publication Wellington, New Zealand
Publication date 2007-03
ISSN 1172-4382
1177-9837
Summary The problems immigrants experience during the process of their psychological and sociocultural adaptation to the host culture have far-reaching effects in terms of mental health, employment and lost benefits for the whole society. General models of the acculturation process (Ward 1996) and acculturation strategies (Berry 2001) provide a basis for the analysis of those problems. The current study employed a qualitative, case-oriented design, based on the grounded theory method to analyse interviews with six Russian-speaking immigrants in New Zealand. The purpose of the study was to investigate, from a psychological perspective, the problems in adaptation as a result of migration and resettlement, and the factors that influence this process. Two distinct patterns were revealed, linked to acculturation strategies of integration and separation. All the participants experienced high levels of psychological distress in the initial stage of their resettlement, but those who later chose the integration strategy of acculturation were more successful and satisfied with their adaptation than those who chose the strategy of separation. Factors contributing to the process of adaptation were migration motivation, proportion of perceived gains and losses, and cultural identity. This study has implications for social policies in the areas of employment, education and mental health.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Social Policy Agency
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30034195

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.