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Bacterial genomic G + C composition-eliciting environmental adaptation

Mann, Scott and Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe 2010, Bacterial genomic G + C composition-eliciting environmental adaptation, Genomics, vol. 95, no. 1, pp. 7-15.

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Title Bacterial genomic G + C composition-eliciting environmental adaptation
Alternative title Review : Bacterial genomic G + C composition-eliciting environmental adaptation
Author(s) Mann, Scott
Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe
Journal name Genomics
Volume number 95
Issue number 1
Start page 7
End page 15
Total pages 9
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2010-01
ISSN 0888-7543
1089-8646
Keyword(s) genome profiling
G + C content profiling
bacteria
pathogenicity
genome reduction
Summary Bacterial genomes reflect their adaptation strategies through nucleotide usage trends found in their chromosome composition. Bacteria, unlike eukaryotes contain a wide range of genomic G + C. This wide variability may be viewed as a response to environmental adaptation. Two overarching trends are observed across bacterial genomes, the first, correlates genomic G + C to environmental niches and lifestyle, while the other utilizees intra-genomic G + C incongruence to delineate horizontally transferred material. In this review, we focus on the influence of several properties including biochemical, genetic flows, selection biases, and the biochemical-energetic properties shaping genome composition. Outcomes indicate a trend toward high G + C and larger genomes in free-living organisms, as a result of more complex and varied environments (higher chance for horizontal gene transfer). Conversely, nutrient limiting and nutrient poor environments dictate smaller genomes of low GC in attempts to conserve replication expense. Varied processes including translesion repair mechanisms, phage insertion and cytosine degradation has been shown to introduce higher AT in genomic sequences. We conclude the review with an analysis of current bioinformatics tools seeking to elicit compositional variances and highlight the practical implications when using such techniques.
Language eng
Field of Research 080301 Bioinformatics Software
Socio Economic Objective 890299 Computer Software and Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30034416

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Information Technology
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