You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Wry-necked memory : the matter of Ireland in cutting green hay and memory Ireland, and the poems of the pattern.

Devlin-Glass, Frances 2010, Wry-necked memory : the matter of Ireland in cutting green hay and memory Ireland, and the poems of the pattern., Association for the study of Australian literature. JASAL, Vincent Buckley Special Issue, pp. 1-10.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
devlinglass-wrynecked-2010.pdf Published version application/pdf 68.85KB 169

Title Wry-necked memory : the matter of Ireland in cutting green hay and memory Ireland, and the poems of the pattern.
Formatted title ‘[W]ry-necked memory’ : the matter of Ireland in Cutting Green Hay and Memory Ireland, and the poems of The Pattern.
Author(s) Devlin-Glass, Frances
Journal name Association for the study of Australian literature. JASAL
Season Vincent Buckley Special Issue
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 11
Publisher Association for the Study of Australian Literature
Place of publication Toowoomba, Qld.
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1447-8986
1833-6027
Summary This paper examines the matter of Ireland in Buckley’s two memoirs, Cutting Green Hay (1983) and Memory Ireland (1985), and the poems of The Pattern (1979), in order to revisit critically the ways in which he constructs himself as a diasporic Irish-Australian, a participant in the most remote Gaeltacht. It raises questions of victimhood, of similar and different experience of being at the mercy of the land, and of his re-engineering of the place of the political in poetry. It argues that Buckley’s agonized positioning as Ireland’s ‘guest/foreigner/son’ was a project that was doomed by its utopianism, and that, obsessed as he became with Ireland, the angst within had little to do with ‘the Ireland within’ or without. The paper suggests that the poet’s slow and unacknowledged abandonment in his Irish period of a key tenet of modernism, its distrust of propaganda and the political, is in itself a new formation which had some continuity with the radicalism of his thinking during the formative years of the revolutionary catholic apostolate he led both at the University of Melbourne and nationally. It also points to the deployment of an ancient medieval Irish trope, that of the ocean (rather than a landmass) linking a dispersed community, as one of the ways the poetry effects a resolution of the issues of being ‘Irish’ in a remote country.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 190402 Creative Writing (incl Playwriting)
Socio Economic Objective 970119 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of the Creative Arts and Writing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, The Author
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30034516

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 293 Abstract Views, 169 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 09 May 2011, 12:57:19 EST by Kylie Koulkoudinas

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.