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A haptic training environment for the heart myoblast cell injection procedure

Le, Vu Thanh and Nahavandi, Saeid 2010, A haptic training environment for the heart myoblast cell injection procedure, in ICARCV 2010 : 11th International Conference on Control, Automation, Robotics and Vision, IEEE, Piscataway, N.J., pp. 448-452.

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Title A haptic training environment for the heart myoblast cell injection procedure
Author(s) Le, Vu Thanh
Nahavandi, Saeid
Conference name IEEE International Conference on Control, Automation, Robotics & Vision (11th : 2010 : Singapore)
Conference location Singapore
Conference dates 7-10 Dec. 2010
Title of proceedings ICARCV 2010 : 11th International Conference on Control, Automation, Robotics and Vision
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2010
Conference series International Conference on Control, Automation, Robotics and Vision
Start page 448
End page 452
Total pages 5
Publisher IEEE
Place of publication Piscataway, N.J.
Keyword(s) haptics
robotics
surgery
cardiac arrest
myoblast injectiion
Summary The heart muscle of a cardiac arrest victim continues to accumulate damage throughout its lifetime. This reduces the heart's ability to pump sufficient oxygen and nutrient blood to meet the body's needs. Medical researchers have shown that direct injection of pre-harvested skeletal myoblast cells into the heart can restore some muscle function [1]. This operative procedure usually necessitates the surgeon to open a patient's chest. The open chest procedure is usually a lengthy process and often extends the recovery time of the patient. Alternatively, a high accuracy surgical aid robotic system can be used to assist the thoracoscopic surgery [2][3]. While the robotic surgical method aids faster patient recovery, a less experienced surgeon can potentially cause damage to surrounding tissue.

This paper presents a study into the development of a virtual haptically-enabled heart myoblast injection simulation environment, which can be used to train new surgeons to get hands on experience with the process. The paper also discusses the development of a generic constraint motion technique for needle insertion. Experiments on human performance measures and efficacy, while interacting with haptic feedback training models, are also presented. The experiment involved 10 operators, with each person repeating the needle insertion and injection 10 times. A notable improvement in the task execution time with the number of repetitions was observed. Operators improved their time by up to 300% compared to their first training attempt for a static heart scenario. Under a dynamic heart motion, operator's performance was slightly lower, with the successful rate of completing the experiment reduced from 84% to 75%.
Notes This material is presented to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work. Copyright and all rights therein are retained by authors or by other copyright holders. All persons copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each author's copyright. In most cases, these works may not be reposted without the explicit permission of the copyright holder.
ISBN 1424478154
9781424478156
Language eng
Field of Research 090999 Geomatic Engineering not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2010
Copyright notice ©2010, IEEE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30034525

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Engineering
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.