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Growth restriction before and after birth increases kinase signaling pathways in the adult rat heart

Wadley, G. D., Wlodek, M. E., Ng, G., Goodman, C., Stathis, C. and McConell, G. K. 2010, Growth restriction before and after birth increases kinase signaling pathways in the adult rat heart, Journal of developmental origins of health and disease, vol. 1, no. 6, pp. 376-385.

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Title Growth restriction before and after birth increases kinase signaling pathways in the adult rat heart
Author(s) Wadley, G. D.
Wlodek, M. E.
Ng, G.
Goodman, C.
Stathis, C.
McConell, G. K.
Journal name Journal of developmental origins of health and disease
Volume number 1
Issue number 6
Start page 376
End page 385
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2010-12-01
ISSN 2040-1744
Keyword(s) development
cardiac muscle
kinases
foetal programming
Summary To investigate the mechanisms for the previously reported development of adult cardiac hypertrophy in male rats following growth restriction, the levels of oxidative stress and activation of signaling kinases were measured in the left ventricle (LV) of adult rat offspring. In experiment one, bilateral uterine vessel ligation to induce uteroplacental insufficiency and growth restriction in the offspring (Restricted) or sham surgery was performed during pregnancy. Litters from sham mothers had litter size either reduced (Reduced Litter), which also restricted postnatal growth, or were left unaltered (Control). In males, Reduced Litter offspring had increased LV phosphorylation of AMPKa, p38 MAPK and Akt compared with Restricted and Controls (P,0.05). In females, both Restricted and Reduced Litter adult offspring had increased LV phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Akt, however, only Restricted offspring had increased phosphorylation of AMPKa (P,0.05). In addition, only Restricted male offspring displayed LV oxidative stress (P,0.05). Experiment two investigated in mothers exposed to uteroplacental insufficiency or sham surgery the effects of cross-fostering offspring at birth, and therefore the effects of the postnatal lactational environment. Surprisingly, the cross-fostering itself resulted in increased LV phosphorylation of AMPKa and Akt in females and increased phosphorylation of Akt in males compared with Control non-cross-fostered offspring (P,0.05). In conclusion, kinase signaling in the adult LV can be programmed by uteroplacental insufficiency induced growth restriction in a gender-specific manner. In addition, the heart of adult rats is also sensitive to programming following the postnatal intervention of cross-fostering alone as well as by postnatal growth restriction.
Notes First published online 19 November 2010
Language eng
Field of Research 111699 Medical Physiology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920103 Cardiovascular System and Diseases
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2010
Copyright notice ©2010, Cambridge University Press and the International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30034633

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.