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Gatekeeper influence on food acquisition, food preparation and family diet

Reid, Mike, Worsley, Tony and Mavondo, Felix 2009, Gatekeeper influence on food acquisition, food preparation and family diet, in ANZMAC 2009 : Sustainable Management and Marketing : Proceedings of the 2009 Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, ANZMAC, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 1-8.

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Title Gatekeeper influence on food acquisition, food preparation and family diet
Author(s) Reid, Mike
Worsley, Tony
Mavondo, Felix
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy. Conference (2009 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 30 Nov.-2 Dec. 2009
Title of proceedings ANZMAC 2009 : Sustainable Management and Marketing : Proceedings of the 2009 Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference
Editor(s) Tojib, Dewi
Publication date 2009
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference
Start page 1
End page 8
Publisher ANZMAC
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) obesogenicity
food acquisition
food preparation
diet satisfaction
Summary The problems associated with overweight and obesity has focused attention on obesogenic, or obesity promoting environments. The home environment, in particular the role of the main food gatekeeper, has come under particular scrutiny for its impact on the family diet (Campbell et al, 2007; Coveney, 2004; Crawford et al, 2007). 326 US and 323 Australian gatekeepers are studied to understand relationships between healthy eating capability, food acquisition and food preparation behaviours, and satisfaction with the household diet. The results suggest that gatekeeper attitudes and perceived control over family diet play a significant role in shaping food-related behaviours and diet satisfaction. Impulsiveness, focusing on freshness, meal planning, and vegetable prominence in meals are also important behavioural factors for satisfaction with diet.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 1863081585
9781863081580
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2009, ANZMAC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30034809

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.