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Do Red Knots (Calidris Canutus Islandica) routinely skip Iceland during southward migration?

Dietz, Maurine W., Spaans, Bernard, Dekinga, Anne, Klaassen, Marcel, Korthals, Harry, van Leeuwen, Casper and Piersma, Theunis 2010, Do Red Knots (Calidris Canutus Islandica) routinely skip Iceland during southward migration?, Condor, vol. 112, no. 1, pp. 48-55.

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Title Do Red Knots (Calidris Canutus Islandica) routinely skip Iceland during southward migration?
Formatted title Do Red Knots (Calidris Canutus Islandica) routinely skip Iceland during southward migration?
Author(s) Dietz, Maurine W.
Spaans, Bernard
Dekinga, Anne
Klaassen, MarcelORCID iD for Klaassen, Marcel orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Korthals, Harry
van Leeuwen, Casper
Piersma, Theunis
Journal name Condor
Volume number 112
Issue number 1
Start page 48
End page 55
Total pages 8
Publisher Cooper Ornithological Club
Place of publication Santa Clara, Calif.
Publication date 2010-02
ISSN 0010-5422
1938-5129
Keyword(s) age effect
stable carbon isotope
migration
sex
shorebird
stopover ecology
Red Knot
Calidris canutus
Summary Subspecies Calidris canutus islandica of the Red Knot breeds on the arctic tundra of northeastern Canada and northern Greenland and winters along the coasts of northwestern Europe. During northward migration, it stops over in either Iceland or northern Norway. It has been assumed that it does the same during southward migration. Using ratios of stable carbon isotopes (δ 13 C) in whole blood, blood cells, and plasma, we investigated evidence for a stopover in Iceland en route from the breeding grounds to the Dutch Wadden Sea. With the expected diet (shellfish) and stopover duration at Iceland (12-15 days, maximum 17 days) and the turnover rates of blood cells (15.1 days) and plasma (6.0 days), Red Knots that stopped in Iceland should arrive with a blood (cell) δ 13 C midway between a tundra (-24.7[per thousand]) and a marine value (-14.0[per thousand]) and a plasma δ13 C approaching the marine value (-15.3[per thousand]). However, many adults arriving at the Wadden Sea had δ13 C ratios in blood (cells) and plasma below these levels, and some arrived with clear tundra signals in blood cells, suggesting that they skipped Iceland during southward migration. Surprisingly, available data suggest this also to be true for juveniles during their first southward migration. The δ 13 C signature of second-year birds confirmed that they oversummered in the Wadden Sea. Our findings contradict the largely untested idea that juvenile shorebirds make more stopovers than adults as well as the idea that the migration between the Nearctic and Europe is necessarily a two-leg process.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, The Cooper Ornithological Society
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035079

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