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Seasonal changes in the diet of the long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta) assessed by analysis of faecal scats and of stable isotopes in blood

Thums, Michele, Klaassen, Marcel and Hume, Ian D. 2005, Seasonal changes in the diet of the long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta) assessed by analysis of faecal scats and of stable isotopes in blood, Australian journal of zoology, vol. 53, no. 2, pp. 87-93, doi: 10.1071/ZO04030.

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Title Seasonal changes in the diet of the long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta) assessed by analysis of faecal scats and of stable isotopes in blood
Formatted title Seasonal changes in the diet of the long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta) assessed by analysis of faecal scats and of stable isotopes in blood
Author(s) Thums, Michele
Klaassen, MarcelORCID iD for Klaassen, Marcel orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Hume, Ian D.
Journal name Australian journal of zoology
Volume number 53
Issue number 2
Start page 87
End page 93
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic.
Publication date 2005
ISSN 0004-959X
1446-5698
Summary The diet of long-nosed bandicoots (Perameles nasuta) on the central coast of New South Wales, Australia, was examined over two summers and two winters using a combination of faecal scat analysis for food fragments and stable isotope analysis (ratios of 13C/12C and 15N/14N) of blood. Isotope ratios in blood overlapped most strongly with those in invertebrate prey, and varied much less between seasons than did those in most dietary items, suggesting that the assimilated diet of long-nosed bandicoots is dominated by invertebrates throughout the year. Invertebrate remains dominated collected faeces in both seasons, even though the availability of invertebrate prey was higher in summer. Thus both techniques indicated that long-nosed bandicoots were primarily insectivorous year-round. Faecal scat analysis indicated that invertebrate eggs were more abundant in summer than winter. At a finer scale, spiders, orthopterans, lepidopteran larvae, ants, leaf material (non-grass monocot) and seeds were more abundant in summer, while cicada larvae, roots, fungi, grass leaves and Acacia bract (small modified leaves appearing as scales) were more abundant in winter. Subterranean foods (cicada larvae, plant roots and hypogeous fungi) were more abundant in winter and more abundant in the diet of males than of either lactating or non-lactating females.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/ZO04030
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, CSIRO
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035116

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