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Does the prescriptive lifestyle of Seventh-Day Adventists provide 'immunity' from the secular effects of changes in BMI?

Kent, Lillian M. and Worsley, Anthony 2009, Does the prescriptive lifestyle of Seventh-Day Adventists provide 'immunity' from the secular effects of changes in BMI?, Public health nutrition, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 472-480.

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Title Does the prescriptive lifestyle of Seventh-Day Adventists provide 'immunity' from the secular effects of changes in BMI?
Author(s) Kent, Lillian M.
Worsley, Anthony
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 12
Issue number 4
Start page 472
End page 480
Total pages 9
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) lifestyle
diet
body mass index
Seventh-day Adventist
physical activity
Summary Objective: To examine the effect of Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) membership on ‘immunity’ to the secular effects of changes in BMI.

Design:
Three independent, cross-sectional, screening surveys conducted by Sydney Adventist Hospital in 1976, 1986 and 1988 and a survey conducted among residents of Melbourne in 2006.

Subjects: Two hundred and fifty-two SDA and 464 non-SDA in 1976; 166 SDA and 291 non-SDA in 1986; 120 SDA and 300-non SDA in 1988; and 251 SDA and 294 non-SDA in 2006.

Measurements:
Height and weight measured by hospital staff in 1976, 1986 and 1988; self-reported by respondents in 2006.

Results:
The mean BMI of non-SDA men increased between 1986 and 2006 (P < 0·001) but did not change for SDA men or non-SDA women. Despite small increases in SDA women’s mean BMI (P = 0·030) between 1988 and 2006, this was no different to that of SDA men and non-SDA women in 2006. The diet and eating patterns of SDA men and women were more ‘prudent’ than those of non-SDA men and women, including more fruit, vegetables, grains, nuts and legumes, and less alcohol, meat, sweetened drinks and coffee. Many of these factors were found to be predictors of lower BMI.

Conclusion: The ‘prudent’ dietary and lifestyle prescriptions of SDA men appear to have ‘immunised’ them to the secular effects of changes that occurred among non-SDA men’s BMI. The dietary and lifestyle trends of SDA women did not reflect the increase in their BMI observed in 2006.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035120

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