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Breakfast size is related to body mass index for men, but not women

Kent, Lillian M. and Worsley, Anthony 2010, Breakfast size is related to body mass index for men, but not women, Nutrition research, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 240-245, doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2010.03.006.

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Title Breakfast size is related to body mass index for men, but not women
Author(s) Kent, Lillian M.
Worsley, AnthonyORCID iD for Worsley, Anthony orcid.org/0000-0002-4635-6059
Journal name Nutrition research
Volume number 30
Issue number 4
Start page 240
End page 245
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2010-04
ISSN 0271-5317
1879-0739
Keyword(s) breakfast
survey
dietary practice
BMI
men
prudent lifestyle
affluent lifestyle
Summary The objective of this study was to examine the effect of self-reported breakfast size, daily eating, and other health habits on body mass index (BMI). We hypothesized that a consumption of a substantial breakfast compared with skipping or small breakfasts would be associated with lower BMI. Three independent, cross-sectional, screening surveys were conducted by Sydney Adventist Hospital in 1976, 1986, and 2005 in the surrounding community. The archived survey forms of 384 men and 338 women in 1976, 244 men and 229 women in 1986, and 270 men and 62 women in 2005 were randomly selected. Body mass index was determined from height and weight measured by hospital staff. The reported amount consumed at breakfast was one of several eating habits that predicted BMI for men but not women. It explained 5% to 6% of the variance in male BMI in all 3 years examined. As the reported breakfast amount increased, men's BMI decreased. Lifestyle confounders including vegetarianism and physical activity did not affect this relationship. However, the consumption of breakfast was significantly positively associated with consumption of cereals, bread, fruit, and spreads, while coffee consumption was significantly associated with smaller breakfasts or breakfast skipping. The consumption of relatively large breakfasts may influence BMI in men, and its promotion may help reduce the prevalence of obesity in Australia and elsewhere.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.nutres.2010.03.006
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035121

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