You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Trends in BMI, diet and lifestyle between 1976 and 2005 in North Sydney

Kent, Lillian M. and Worsley, Anthony 2009, Trends in BMI, diet and lifestyle between 1976 and 2005 in North Sydney, Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 453-461.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
worsley-trendsinbmi-2009.pdf Published version application/pdf 207.89KB 82

Title Trends in BMI, diet and lifestyle between 1976 and 2005 in North Sydney
Author(s) Kent, Lillian M.
Worsley, Anthony
Journal name Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition
Volume number 18
Issue number 3
Start page 453
End page 461
Total pages 9
Publisher HEC Press
Place of publication McKinnon, Vic.
Publication date 2009-09
ISSN 0964-7058
1440-6047
Keyword(s) BMI
diet
lifestyle
prudent lifestyle
western lifestyle
Summary Although the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Australia has increased during the past 30 years, little is known about the dietary and behavioural antecedents of body mass index (BMI). We examined changes in mean BMI, diet, and other lifestyle behaviours between 1976 and 2005 and described the cross-sectional associations between these factors and BMI. A series of biennial biomedical surveys by Sydney Adventist Hospital from 1976 to 2005 allowed examination of BMI trends, while the selection of three surveys enabled detailed examination of likely dietary and lifestyle associations. Subjects included in this study were: 384 men and 338 women in 1976; 160 men and 146 women in 1978; 166 men and 141 women in 1980; 164 men and 142 women in 1982; 177 men and 13 women in 1984; 239 men and 227 women in 1986; 210 men and 225 women in 1988; 165 men and 148 women in 1990; 138 men and 167 women in 1992 and 270 men and 62 women in 2005. Height and weight were measured by hospital staff. Mean BMI increased in the early 1990s. Salt, coffee, cola, alcohol and meat consumption, dieting to lose weight and eating between meals were positively associated with BMI while physical activity, food variety, large breakfasts and consumption of spreads were negatively associated. Food consumption and daily activities have important associations with BMI, though their specific associations differ by sex. 'Affluent' lifestyle patterns appear to contribute to higher BMI, while a more 'prudent' lifestyle seems to protect from such increases.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, HEC Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035122

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 14 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 226 Abstract Views, 82 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 30 May 2011, 11:00:31 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.