Processes of task performance as measured by the assessment of motor and process skills (AMPS): a predictor of work-related outcomes for adults with schizophrenia?

Haslam, Julie, Pépin, Geneviève, Bourbonnais, Renée and Grignon, Sylvain 2010, Processes of task performance as measured by the assessment of motor and process skills (AMPS): a predictor of work-related outcomes for adults with schizophrenia?, Work : a journal of prevention, assessment & rehabilitation, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 53-64.

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Title Processes of task performance as measured by the assessment of motor and process skills (AMPS): a predictor of work-related outcomes for adults with schizophrenia?
Author(s) Haslam, Julie
Pépin, Geneviève
Bourbonnais, Renée
Grignon, Sylvain
Journal name Work : a journal of prevention, assessment & rehabilitation
Volume number 37
Issue number 1
Start page 53
End page 64
Publisher IOS Press
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1051-9815
1875-9270
Summary Objective: To determine whether the processes of task performance as measured by the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) would discriminate between the employment levels of adults with schizophrenia. Participants: Twenty adults with schizophrenia who were engaged either in competitive employment, supported employment, prevocational training, or nonvocational activities, participated in this exploratory study. Methods: Each participant completed the AMPS, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), and theWorker Role Interview (WRI) to gather data about their occupational performance, symptoms, drug / alcohol use, and psychosocial / environmental factors that might influence their work related outcomes. Results: Analysis revealed a moderate correlation between the level of employment and the global scores of the process skills scale in the AMPS. Conclusions: This should be seen as preliminary evidence that beyond the basic cognitive functions, processes of task performance may also be a predictor of work related outcomes for this population. The results also highlighted the importance of considering personal causation and worker roles when assessing the work capacities of these clients. Finally, findings supported the four levels of employment used in this study, which appeared to form a continuum from nonvocational activities, prevocational training, supported employment, through to competitive employment.
Language eng
Field of Research 110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl Physiotherapy)
Socio Economic Objective 920209 Mental Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, IOS Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035355

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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