Openly accessible

Assessing cost-effectiveness in obesity : active transport program for primary school children— TravelSMART schools curriculum program

Moodie, Marj, Haby, Michelle M., Swinburn, Boyd and Carter, Robert 2011, Assessing cost-effectiveness in obesity : active transport program for primary school children— TravelSMART schools curriculum program, Journal of physical activity and health, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 503-515.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
moodie-assessingcost-2011.pdf Published version application/pdf 596.31KB 325

Title Assessing cost-effectiveness in obesity : active transport program for primary school children— TravelSMART schools curriculum program
Author(s) Moodie, Marj
Haby, Michelle M.
Swinburn, Boyd
Carter, Robert
Journal name Journal of physical activity and health
Volume number 8
Issue number 4
Start page 503
End page 515
Total pages 13
Publisher Human Kinetics
Place of publication Champaign, Ill.
Publication date 2011-05
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Keyword(s) walking
children
weight gain
Summary Background: To assess from a societal perspective the cost-effectiveness of a school program to increase active transport in 10- to 11-year-old Australian children as an obesity prevention measure.
Methods: The TravelSMART Schools Curriculum program was modeled nationally for 2001 in terms of its impact on Body Mass Index (BMI) and Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) measured against current practice. Cost offsets and DALY benefits were modeled until the eligible cohort reached age 100 or died. The intervention was qualitatively assessed against second stage filter criteria (‘equity,’ ‘strength of evidence,’ ‘acceptability to stakeholders,’ ‘feasibility of implementation,’ ‘sustainability,’ and ‘side-effects’) given their potential impact on funding decisions.
Results: The modeled intervention reached 267,700 children and cost $AUD13.3M (95% uncertainty interval [UI] $6.9M; $22.8M) per year. It resulted in an incremental saving of 890 (95%UI –540; 2,900) BMI units, which translated to 95 (95% UI –40; 230) DALYs and a net cost per DALY saved of $AUD117,000 (95% UI dominated; $1.06M).
Conclusions: The intervention was not cost-effective as an obesity prevention measure under base-run modeling assumptions. The attribution of some costs to nonobesity objectives would be justified given the program’s multiple benefits. Cost-effectiveness would be further improved by considering the wider school community impacts.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 140208 Health Economics
Socio Economic Objective 920207 Health Policy Economic Outcomes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Human Kinetics, Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035362

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 375 Abstract Views, 325 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 08 Jun 2011, 09:45:47 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.