Seasonal winds drive water temperature cycle and migration patterns of Southern Australian giant crab Pseudocarcinus gigas

Levings, Andrew H. and Gill, Peter C. 2010, Seasonal winds drive water temperature cycle and migration patterns of Southern Australian giant crab Pseudocarcinus gigas, in Biology and Management of Exploited Crab Populations under Climate Change : 25th Lowell Wakefield Fisheries Symposium, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, pp. 461-478.

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Title Seasonal winds drive water temperature cycle and migration patterns of Southern Australian giant crab Pseudocarcinus gigas
Formatted title Seasonal winds drive water temperature cycle and migration patterns of Southern Australian giant crab Pseudocarcinus gigas
Author(s) Levings, Andrew H.
Gill, Peter C.
Conference name Lowell Wakefield Fisheries Symposium (25th : 2009 : Anchorage, Alaska)
Conference location Anchorage, Alaska
Conference dates 10–13 March 2009
Title of proceedings Biology and Management of Exploited Crab Populations under Climate Change : 25th Lowell Wakefield Fisheries Symposium
Editor(s) Kruse, G. H.
Eckert, G. L.
Foy, R. J.
Lipcius, R. N.
Sainte-Marie, B
Stram, D. L.
Woodby, D.
Publication date 2010
Series 25th Lowell Wakefield Fisheries Symposium
Conference series Lowell Wakefield Fisheries Symposium
Start page 461
End page 478
Total pages 572 p.
Publisher University of Alaska Fairbanks
Place of publication Fairbanks, Alaska
Summary The giant crab Pseudocarcinus gigas occurs along the continental shelf break of southern Australia. During the summer alongshore winds cause cooler water to upwell onto the shelf, and the crabs move from deeper water onto the shelf where there is more food. The combination of a preferred thermal niche and a depth-stratified food supply defines the favorable foraging environments that enhance the growth of P. gigas. Climate change is expected to cause a southerly shift of the austral subtropical high-pressure belt, and modelers have predicted more upwelling-favorable winds. The associated increase in the circulation of cooler water across the shelf is likely to provide P. gigas with an increased access to benthic food resources and their growth rate may increase in some regions.
ISBN 9781566121545
Language eng
Field of Research 060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
060207 Population Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 960305 Ecosystem Adaptation to Climate Change
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2010
Copyright notice ©2009, Alaska Sea Grant, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035365

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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