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Successional changes in epiphytic rainforest lichens : implications for the management of rainforest communities

Morley, Sharon E. and Gibson, Maria 2010, Successional changes in epiphytic rainforest lichens : implications for the management of rainforest communities, The Lichenologist, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 311-321.

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Title Successional changes in epiphytic rainforest lichens : implications for the management of rainforest communities
Author(s) Morley, Sharon E.
Gibson, Maria
Journal name The Lichenologist
Volume number 42
Issue number 3
Start page 311
End page 321
Total pages 11
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2010-05-01
ISSN 0024-2829
Keyword(s) conservation
cool temperate rainforest
island reservoir
species richness
succession
Summary We explored lichen species richness and patterns of lichen succession on rough barked Nothofagus cunninghamii trees and on smooth barked Atherosperma moschatum trees in cool temperate rainforests in Victoria, Australia. Nothofagus cunninghamii trees from the Yarra Ranges, and A.moschatum trees from Errinundra were ranked into size classes (small, medium, large and extra-large), and differences in species richness and composition were compared between size classes for each tree species. Nothofagus cunninghamii supported a rich lichen flora (108 trees, 52 lichen species), with the largest trees supporting a significantly higher number of species, including many uncommon species. This success was attributed to varying bark texture, stand characteristics and microhabitat variations as the trees age. Atherosperma moschatum supported a comparable number of species (120 trees, 54 lichen species). Indeed on average, this host supported more lichen species than N. cunninghamii. However, successional patterns with increasing girth were not as clear for A. moschatum, possibly due to the more stable microclimate that this smooth barked host provided. Victorian cool temperate rainforests exist primarily as small, often isolated pockets within a sea of Eucalypt-dominated, fire-prone forest. Many are regenerating from past disturbance. We find that protection of Victoria’s oldest rainforest pockets is crucial, as they represent sources of rare, potentially threatened lichen species, and may be acting as reservoirs for propagules for nearby ageing rainforests. Indeed, even single, large old trees have conservation importance, as they may provide exceptional microhabitats, not found elsewhere in the regenerating rainforest environment.


Notes Published online: 25 March 2010
Language eng
Field of Research 060208 Terrestrial Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 969999 Environment not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2010
Copyright notice ©2010, British Lichen Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035374

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.