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Jaisa Desh, Waisa Vesh? Exploratory notes on the representations of adivasis in popular Hindi cinema

Rekhari, Suneeti 2010, Jaisa Desh, Waisa Vesh? Exploratory notes on the representations of adivasis in popular Hindi cinema, in APSA 2010 : Proceedings of the 10th Asia Pacific Sociological Association Conference : Social and Environmental Change : Opportunities and Challenges for the Asia Pacific, [Asian Pacific Sociological Association], [Sabah, Malaysia].

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Title Jaisa Desh, Waisa Vesh? Exploratory notes on the representations of adivasis in popular Hindi cinema
Author(s) Rekhari, Suneeti
Conference name The Asia Pacific Sociological Association Conference (10th : 2010 : Sabah, Malaysia)
Conference location Sabah, Malaysia
Conference dates 8-11 Dec. 2010
Title of proceedings APSA 2010 : Proceedings of the 10th Asia Pacific Sociological Association Conference : Social and Environmental Change : Opportunities and Challenges for the Asia Pacific
Editor(s) [unknown]
Publication date 2010
Publisher [Asian Pacific Sociological Association]
Place of publication [Sabah, Malaysia]
Keyword(s) South Asian Cinema
Summary This paper seeks to discuss specific examples of Adivasi representation in Indian cinema, particularly popular Hindi cinema or ‘Bollywood’ (as opposed to ‘art’ or ‘parallel’ cinema). This choice of popular Hindi cinema is an attempt to explore the ways in which it has distilled and codified the representations of ‘other’ groups for a mass audience. Popular Hindi films have an unmatched circulation and pre-eminence (Prasad, 1998) in India, making the impact of their representations important to consider. Commercial interests of popular Hindi films are paramount, their producers and directors are generally from the upper castes and classes of Indian society. In the push for commercial interests and popular storylines, adequate representations of Adivasis, and as scholars (Vasudev & Lenglet, 1983; Bagchi, 1996; Subramanyam, 1996; Gopalan, 2000; Vridi, 2003) have pointed out women and other social groups, remain stereotypical. Mainstream Hindi cinema, even in its post-colonial phase, has not provided images of various cultural groups in India which reflect their lived reality. It is this cinematic marginalisation and cultural stereotyping, which will be explored further. This paper is a preliminary exploration and will look at particular examples of representation in Hindi films, including Naagin (1954), Ajantrik (1957), Madhumati (1958), Yeh Gulistan Hamara (1972), Lal Salaam (2002), and Chak De! (2007). It is aimed that this exploration will provide a foundation for further research into representations in Hindi cinema and the wider discourses of power, politics and inequality in Indian society.
Language eng
Field of Research 200212 Screen and Media Culture
200202 Asian Cultural Studies
190201 Cinema Studies
Socio Economic Objective 950204 The Media
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
HERDC collection year 2010
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035400

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Institute of Koorie Education
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Created: Tue, 14 Jun 2011, 18:05:28 EST by Suneeti Rekhari

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