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Mixed methods : a research design for management doctoral dissertations

Jogulu, Uma D. and Pansiri, Jaloni 2011, Mixed methods : a research design for management doctoral dissertations, Management research review, vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 687-701.

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Title Mixed methods : a research design for management doctoral dissertations
Author(s) Jogulu, Uma D.
Pansiri, Jaloni
Journal name Management research review
Volume number 34
Issue number 6
Start page 687
End page 701
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2011
ISSN 2040-8277
Keyword(s) Quantitative methods
Qualitative methods
Theses
Data collection
Strategic alliances
Leadership
Summary Purpose – This paper seeks to examine two management doctoral research projects to highlight the advantages in mixed methods as the primary research design.
Design/methodology/approach – This paper summarises the methods of data collection and analysis which were used by two doctoral students in their management research. The researchers used mixed methods approaches (quantitative and qualitative) to explore different areas of management.
Findings – The paper supports the view that triangulation of research methods strengthens the findings and inferences made for understanding social phenomena in more depth, compared to using a single method.
Research limitations/implications – The paper relies excessively on two doctoral research projects which utilise sequential mixed methods. Therefore, arguments made in the paper are specific because other doctoral projects that have used different methods from those employed in the two projects were not considered.
Practical implications – Early researchers, in particular students commencing doctorate studies, should apply mixed methods research because it develops skills in the two most dominant data collection methods used in management research. This paper is a practical guide on how this could be done effectively.
Originality/value – The paper is drawn from two unique doctoral research projects. The paper’s originality and value is in providing experiences and practical insights on how mixed methods research is undertaken.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 150399 Business and Management not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 910402 Management
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035421

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.