A role for glutathione in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia? Animal models and relevance to clinical practice.

Dean, O. M., van den Buuse, M., Bush, A. I., Copolov, D. L., Ng, F., Dodd, S. and Berk, M. 2009, A role for glutathione in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia? Animal models and relevance to clinical practice., Current medicinal chemistry, vol. 16, no. 23, pp. 2965-2976.

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Title A role for glutathione in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia? Animal models and relevance to clinical practice.
Author(s) Dean, O. M.
van den Buuse, M.
Bush, A. I.
Copolov, D. L.
Ng, F.
Dodd, S.
Berk, M.
Journal name Current medicinal chemistry
Volume number 16
Issue number 23
Start page 2965
End page 2976
Publisher Bentham Science Publishers
Place of publication Schiphol, The Netherlands
Publication date 2009
ISSN 0929-8673
1875-533X
Keyword(s) glutathione
n-acetyl cysteine
oxidative stress
schizophrenia
mania
depression
bipolar disorder
animal models
Summary The tripeptide, glutathione (glutamylcysteinylglycine) is the primary endogenous free radical scavenger in the human body. When glutathione (GSH) levels are reduced there is an increased potential for cellular oxidative stress, characterised by an increase and accruement of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This could partly be caused by alterations in dopaminergic and glutamatergic activity that are implicated in these illnesses. Glutamate and dopamine are highly redox reactive molecules and produce ROS during normal neurotransmission. Alterations to these neurotransmitter pathways may therefore increase the oxidative burden in the brain. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction, as a source of oxidative stress, has been documented in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The combination of altered neurotransmission and this mitochondrial dysfunction leading to oxidative damage may ultimately contribute to illness symptoms. Animal models have been established to investigate the involvement of glutathione depletion in aspects of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder to further characterise the role of oxidative stress in psychopathology. Stemming from preclinical evidence, clinical studies have recently shown antioxidant precursor treatment to be effective in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, providing a novel clinical angle to augment often suboptimal conventional treatments.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Bentham Science Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035471

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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