Effects of N-acetylcysteine on substance use in bipolar disorder : a randomized placebo controlled clinical trial

Bernardo, Michelle, Dodd, Seetal, Gama, Clarissa S., Copolov, David L., Dean, Olivia, Kohlmann, Kristy, Jeavons, Susan, Schapkaitz, Ian, Anderson-Hunt, Murray, Bush, Ashley I. and Berk, Michael 2009, Effects of N-acetylcysteine on substance use in bipolar disorder : a randomized placebo controlled clinical trial, Acta neuropsychiatrica, vol. 21, no. 5, pp. 239-245.

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Title Effects of N-acetylcysteine on substance use in bipolar disorder : a randomized placebo controlled clinical trial
Formatted title Effects of N-acetylcysteine on substance use in bipolar disorder : a randomized placebo controlled clinical trial
Author(s) Bernardo, Michelle
Dodd, Seetal
Gama, Clarissa S.
Copolov, David L.
Dean, Olivia
Kohlmann, Kristy
Jeavons, Susan
Schapkaitz, Ian
Anderson-Hunt, Murray
Bush, Ashley I.
Berk, Michael
Journal name Acta neuropsychiatrica
Volume number 21
Issue number 5
Start page 239
End page 245
Publisher Wiley Blackwell
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2009-10
ISSN 0924-2708
1601-5215
Keyword(s) alcohol
bipolar disorder
caffeine
clinical trial
N-acetyl cysteine
smoking
substance use
Summary Objective: To evaluate the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on substance use in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of NAC in bipolar disorder. It is hypothesised that NAC will be superior to placebo for reducing scores on the Clinical Global Impressions scale for Substance Use (CGI-SU).

Methods:
Participants were randomised to 6-months of treatment with 2 g/day NAC (n = 38) or placebo (n = 37). Substance use was assessed at baseline using the Habits instrument. Change in substance use was assessed at regular study visits using the CGI-SU.

Results: Amongst the 75 participants 78.7% drank alcohol (any frequency), 45.3% smoked tobacco and 92% consumer caffeine. Other substances were used by fewer than six participants. Caffeine use was significantly lower for NAC-treated participants compared with placebo at week 2 of treatment but not at other study visits.

Conclusion: NAC appeared to have little effect on substance use in this population. A larger study on a substance using population will be necessary to determine if NAC may be a useful treatment for substance use.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, John Wiley & Sons
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035563

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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