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Olanzapine / fluoxetine combination for treatment resistant depression : efficacy and clinical utility

Dodd, Seetal and Berk, Michael 2008, Olanzapine / fluoxetine combination for treatment resistant depression : efficacy and clinical utility, Expert review of neurotherapeutics, vol. 8, no. 9, pp. 1299-1306.

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Title Olanzapine / fluoxetine combination for treatment resistant depression : efficacy and clinical utility
Author(s) Dodd, Seetal
Berk, Michael
Journal name Expert review of neurotherapeutics
Volume number 8
Issue number 9
Start page 1299
End page 1306
Total pages 8
Publisher Expert Reviews
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2008-09
ISSN 1473-7175
1744-8360
Keyword(s) antidepressant
treatment-resistant depression
olanzapine/fluoxetine combination
atypical antipsychotic
Summary Antidepressant monotherapy is a first-line treatment for depression; however, not all sufferers will adequately respond to treatment. When treating a patient with treatment-resistant depression, the clinician needs to consider all factors which may contribute to an inadequate response to an antidepressant. These include accuracy of diagnosis and medication adherence, as well as the patient’s personality, lifestyle, life events and social circumstances. If it is determined that treatment resistance is due to failure of efficacy of antidepressant monotherapy, then an augmentation strategy using an atypical antipsychotic may be considered. Treatment using olanzapine/fluoxetine combination (OFC) is one of many options. Four randomized, acute-phase trials have suggested OFC is useful for reducing Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores after inadequate response to antidepressant monotherapy. OFC has been useful at doses of olanzapine/fluoxetine 6/25, 6/50, 12/25 and 12/50 mg/day, with 1/5 mg/day suggested to be an ineffective dose. Treatment with OFC has been associated with some side effects, including weight gain and the metabolic syndrome, somnolence, dry mouth, increased appetite and headache. Treatment decisions therefore need to be made to balance the risks and benefits.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 110319 Psychiatry (incl Psychotherapy)
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Expert Reviews
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035585

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.