Modeling gene-environment interaction in longitudinal data : risk for neuroticism due to interaction between maternal care and the Dopamine 4 Receptor gene (DRD4)

Badcock, Paul B., Moore, Elya, Williamson, Elizabeth, Berk, Michael, Williams, Lana J., Bjerkeset, Ottar, Nordahl, Hans M., Patton, George C. and Olsson, Craig A. 2011, Modeling gene-environment interaction in longitudinal data : risk for neuroticism due to interaction between maternal care and the Dopamine 4 Receptor gene (DRD4), Australian journal of psychology, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 18-25.

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Title Modeling gene-environment interaction in longitudinal data : risk for neuroticism due to interaction between maternal care and the Dopamine 4 Receptor gene (DRD4)
Author(s) Badcock, Paul B.
Moore, Elya
Williamson, Elizabeth
Berk, Michael
Williams, Lana J.
Bjerkeset, Ottar
Nordahl, Hans M.
Patton, George C.
Olsson, Craig A.
Journal name Australian journal of psychology
Volume number 63
Issue number 1
Start page 18
End page 25
Total pages 8
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2011-03
ISSN 0004-9530
1742-9536
Keyword(s) additive interaction
DRD4
gene-environment interaction
maternal care
neuroticism
Summary The purpose of this study was to investigate risk for neuroticism due to the joint action of low maternal care and compromised mesocorticolimbic ‘reward’ system function linked to a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) in the dopamine 4 receptor gene (DRD4). Data were drawn from the Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study, a longitudinal study of the health and well-being of 2,000 young Australians followed from adolescence to young adulthood across 8 waves from 14- to 28-years. Genetic risk was defined by carriage of at least one copy of the 7-repeat allele or derivative alleles 5, 6, and 8 (labeled 7R+). Neuroticism was assessed in adolescence and young adulthood. We observed an approximately fourfold increase in the odds of reporting neurotic symptoms in carriers of the 7R+ disposition who reported low maternal care compared with non-carriers who reported high maternal care. The percentage of risk attributable to mechanisms in which both factors played a role was 35%. Findings are discussed in terms of implications for prevention.
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035790

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
School of Medicine
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