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Change in running kinematics after cycling are related to alterations in running economy in triathletes

Bonacci, Jason, Green, Daniel, Saunders, Philo U., Blanch, Peter, Franettovich, Melinda, Chapman, Andrew R. and Vicenzino, Bill 2010, Change in running kinematics after cycling are related to alterations in running economy in triathletes, Journal of science and medicine in sport, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 460-464, doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2010.02.002.

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Title Change in running kinematics after cycling are related to alterations in running economy in triathletes
Author(s) Bonacci, JasonORCID iD for Bonacci, Jason orcid.org/0000-0002-4333-3214
Green, Daniel
Saunders, Philo U.
Blanch, Peter
Franettovich, Melinda
Chapman, Andrew R.
Vicenzino, Bill
Journal name Journal of science and medicine in sport
Volume number 13
Issue number 4
Start page 460
End page 464
Total pages 5
Publisher Elsevier Australia
Place of publication Chatswood, N.S.W.
Publication date 2010-07
ISSN 1440-2440
1878-1861
Keyword(s) triathlon
transition
run performance
electromyography (EMG)
Summary Emerging evidence suggests that cycling may influence neuromuscular control during subsequent running but the relationship between altered neuromuscular control and run performance in triathletes is not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine if a 45 min high-intensity cycle influences lower limb movement and muscle recruitment during running and whether changes in limb movement or muscle recruitment are associated with changes in running economy (RE) after cycling. RE, muscle activity (surface electromyography) and limb movement (sagittal plane kinematics) were compared between a control run (no preceding cycle) and a run performed after a 45 min high-intensity cycle in 15 moderately trained triathletes. Muscle recruitment and kinematics during running after cycling were altered in 7 of 15 (46%) triathletes. Changes in kinematics at the knee and ankle were significantly associated with the change in VO2 after cycling (p < 0.05). The change in ankle angle at foot contact alone explained 67.1% of the variance in VO2. These findings suggest that cycling does influence limb movement and muscle recruitment in some triathletes and that changes in kinematics, especially at the ankle, are closely related to alterations in running economy after cycling.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2010.02.002
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Sports Medicine Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30035818

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Created: Fri, 24 Jun 2011, 11:09:13 EST by Leanne Swaneveld

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